Ecology

Associations

Animal / parasite / ectoparasite
Cyclochaeta serpularum ectoparasitises branchial crown of Serpulidae

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Known predators

Serpulidae (Suspension-feeding polychaetes) is prey of:
Leucozonia
Anchoa mitchilli
Menidia beryllina
Bucephala albeaola
Rallus longirostris
Charadrius semipalmatus
sediment POC
Pinixia floridana
Neopanope texana
Processa bermudiensis
Penaeus duoarum
Palaemonetes floridanus

Based on studies in:
Pacific: Bay of Panama (Littoral, Rocky shore)
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • B. A. Menge, J. Lubchenco, S. D. Gaines and L. R. Ashkenas, A test of the Menge-Sutherland model of community organization in a tropical rocky intertidal food web, Oecologia (Berlin) 71:75-89, from p. 85 (1986).
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Serpulidae (Suspension-feeding polychaetes) preys on:
plankton
detritus
phytoplankton
Nauplii2
Nauplii1
Foraminifera
Nematoda
Polychaeta
Harpacticoida
Pycnogonidae
Acartia tonsa

Based on studies in:
Pacific: Bay of Panama (Littoral, Rocky shore)
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • B. A. Menge, J. Lubchenco, S. D. Gaines and L. R. Ashkenas, A test of the Menge-Sutherland model of community organization in a tropical rocky intertidal food web, Oecologia (Berlin) 71:75-89, from p. 85 (1986).
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:407
Specimens with Sequences:212
Specimens with Barcodes:43
Species:38
Species With Barcodes:23
Public Records:185
Public Species:17
Public BINs:15
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:89
Specimens with Sequences:20
Specimens with Barcodes:14
Species:13
Species With Barcodes:5
Public Records:9
Public Species:4
Public BINs:4
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Florida Museum of Natural History
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Serpulidae

Serpulidae is a family of sessile, tube-building annelid worms in the class Polychaeta. The members of this family differ from the sabellid tube worms in that they have a specialized operculum that blocks the entrance of their tubes when they withdraw into the tubes. In addition, serpulids secrete tubes of calcium carbonate. Serpulids are the most important biomineralizers among annelids. There are about 300 known species in the Serpulidae family, all but one of which live in saline waters. The earliest serpulids are known from the Middle Triassic.[1]

The blood of most species of serpulid and sabellid worms contains the oxygen-binding pigment chlorocruorin. This is used to transport oxygen to the tissues. It has an affinity for carbon monoxide which is 570 times as strong as that of the haemoglobin found in human blood.[2]

Empty serpulid shells can sometimes be confused with the shells of a family of marine gastropod mollusks, the Vermetidae or worm snails. The most obvious difference is that serpulid shells are dull inside, whereas the molluscan vermetid shells are shiny inside.

Selected genera[edit]

Pecten sp. with serpulid worm encrusters; Duck Harbor Beach on Cape Cod Bay, Wellfleet, Massachusetts.

References[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ a b Vinn, O.; Mutvei, H. (2009). "Calcareous tubeworms of the Phanerozoic". Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences 58 (4): 286–296. doi:10.3176/earth.2009.4.07. Retrieved 2012-09-16. 
  2. ^ Cowles, David (2006). "Serpula vermicularis Linnaeus, 1767". Invertebrates of the Salish Sea. Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory at Walla Walla University. Retrieved 2011-10-31. 
  3. ^ Read, G.; Fauchald, K., eds. (2014). "Filograna Berkeley, 1835". World Polychaeta database. Retrieved 2015-02-22 – via World Register of Marine Species. 
  4. ^ Prentiss, N.K.; Vasileiadou, K.; Faulwetter, S. et al. (2014). "A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta, Sabellida) from the Caribbean Sea" (PDF). Zootaxa 3900 (2): 204–222. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3900.2.2. 
General
  • "Serpulidae". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2008-06-25. 
  • Abbott, R. Tucker (1986). Seashells of North America. St. Martin's Press. 
  • ten Hove, H.A.; van den Hurk, P. (1993). "A review of recent and fossil serpulid 'reefs'; actuopalaeontology and the 'Upper Malm' serpulid limestones in NW Germany". Geologie en Mijnbouw 72 (1): 23–67. 
  • Ruppert, Edward E.; Fox, Richard S. & Barnes, Robert D. (2004). Invertebrate Zoology: A Functional Evolutionary Approach (7th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole – Thomson Learning Inc. ISBN 0-03-025982-7. 
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Source: Wikipedia

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