Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Sabellidae (Suspension-feeding polychaetes) is prey of:
Anchoa mitchilli
Menidia beryllina
Bucephala albeaola
Rallus longirostris
Charadrius semipalmatus
sediment POC
Pinixia floridana
Neopanope texana
Processa bermudiensis
Penaeus duoarum
Palaemonetes floridanus

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Sabellidae (Suspension-feeding polychaetes) preys on:
phytoplankton
Nauplii2
Nauplii1
Foraminifera
Nematoda
Polychaeta
Harpacticoida
Pycnogonidae
Acartia tonsa

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Classification

Fabriciinae is now regarded as a separate family. See Fabriciidae. Thus subfamily Sabellinae within Sabellidae is currently unneeded.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Radiating filaments filter water: fanworms
 

The radiating filaments of fanworms filter water for food particles efficiently due to increased surface area.

   
  "Increased surface area is extremely useful to many creatures…The radiating filaments of the fanworm filter the water for food particles: the more water is covered, the more food is found." (Foy and Oxford Scientific Films 1982:24)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Foy, Sally; Oxford Scientific Films. 1982. The Grand Design: Form and Colour in Animals. Lingfield, Surrey, U.K.: BLA Publishing Limited for J.M.Dent & Sons Ltd, Aldine House, London. 238 p.
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© The Biomimicry Institute

Source: AskNature

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:522Public Records:122
Specimens with Sequences:280Public Species:22
Specimens with Barcodes:270Public BINs:30
Species:65         
Species With Barcodes:45         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Sabellidae

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Genomic DNA is available from 7 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at British Antarctic Survey
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© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Sabellidae

Sabellidae (feather duster worms) are sedentary marine polychaete tube worms where the head is mostly concealed by feathery branchiae. They build tubes out of parchment, sand, and bits of shell. Glomerula secretes a tube of calcium carbonate. They tend to be common in the intertidal zones around the world. Their oldest fossils are known from the Early Jurassic.[1]

Characteristics[edit]

Sabellidae (feather duster worm).jpg

Feather-duster worms have a crown of feeding appendages or radioles in two fan-shaped clusters projecting from their tubes when under water. Each radiole has paired side branches making a two-edged comb for filter feeding. Most species have a narrow collar below the head. The body segments are smooth and lack parapodia. The usually eight thoracic segments bear capilliaries dorsally and hooked chaetae (bristles) ventrally. The abdominal segments are similar, but with the position of the capilliaries and chaetae reversed. The posterior few abdominal segments may form a spoon-shaped hollow on the ventral side. Size varies between tiny and over 10 cm (2.5 in) long. Some small species can bend over and extend their tentacles to the sea floor to collect detritus.[2]

Genera[edit]

Sabellidae with branchiae (feathers) extended

The following genera belong to the family:[3]

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