Ecology

Associations

Known prey organisms

Molothrus preys on:
Dendroica magnolia

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:73Public Records:40
Specimens with Sequences:63Public Species:6
Specimens with Barcodes:63Public BINs:6
Species:6         
Species With Barcodes:6         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Molothrus

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Wikipedia

Cowbird

Juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird with host/parent dark-eyed Junco

Cowbirds are birds belonging to the genus Molothrus in the family Icteridae. They are brood parasitic New World birds which are unrelated to the Old World cuckoos, one of which, the common cuckoo, is the most famous brood parasitic bird.

The Molothrus genus contains:

The non-brood parasitic baywing was formerly placed in this genus; it is now classified as Agelaioides badius.

Behavior[edit]

These birds feed on insects, including the large numbers that may be stirred up by cattle. In order for the birds to remain mobile and stay with the herd, they have adapted by laying their eggs in other birds' nests. The cowbird will watch for when its host lays eggs, and when the nest is left unattended, the female will come in and lay its own eggs. The female cowbird may continue to observe the nest after laying her eggs. If the cowbird egg is removed, the female cowbird may destroy the host's eggs.[1]

In popular culture[edit]

  • A pair of cowbirds appeared as recurring villains in the comic strip Pogo by Walt Kelly

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeffrey P. Hoover; Scott K. Robinson (13 March 2007). "Retaliatory mafia behavior by a parasitic cowbird favors host acceptance of parasitic eggs". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Retrieved 26 August 2009. 
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