Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Hairy footpads aid walking on loose sand: Fennec Fox
 

Hairy pads or bristles on the feet of desert creatures help them move on loose sand by providing a braking mechanism as the feet push backwards.

   
  "Soles equipped with bristles or hairy pads are also suitable for locomotion over loose sand. Many desert and steppe dwellers walk on such soft and comfortable soles; notable examples are the tarsiers, Tenebrionidae and Asilidae, the Eligmodontia mouse, the sand cat, and the fennec fox." (Tributsch 1984:73)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Tributsch, H. 1984. How life learned to live. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. 218 p.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 4
Specimens with Sequences: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species: 2
Species With Barcodes: 2
Public Records: 4
Public Species: 2
Public BINs: 2
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Tarsius

Tarsius is a genus of tarsiers, small primates native to southeast Asia. Until recently, all tarsier species were assigned to this genus, but recently two species were split off into two other genera, while other species were described.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Groves, C.; Shekelle, M. (2010). "The Genera and Species of Tarsiidae" (PDF). International Journal of Primatology 31 (6): 1071–1082. doi:10.1007/s10764-010-9443-1. 
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