Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) Southeastern United States: Virginia to Florida and along coast of Gulf of Mexico to Texas. Old unreliable reports farther north and a stray in 1998 in southwestern Pennsylvania. Also, Mississippi Valley etc. north to Kentucky and West Virginia. Possibly in Mexico.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Various woodland habitats; shady meadows. Also shaded grassy parks etc. Commoner at lower altitudes. Host plants are in family Poaceae.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

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Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hermeuptychia sosybius

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 31
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Hermeuptychia sosybius

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 7 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

TCA------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------CCTGATATAGCATTCCCGCGTATAAACAATATAAGATTTTGATTATTACCTCCATCTTTAATTTTATTAATTTCTAGTAGTATTGTAGAAAATGGAAGTGGAACAGGATGAACTGTTTACCCCCCTCTTTCATCTAATATTGCTCATAGAGGTTCTTCAGTAGATTTAGCAATTTTTTCTCTTCATTTAGCTGGAATTTCATCAATTTTAGGAGCTATTAATTTTATTACAACAATTATTAATATACGAATTAATAATATATCTTATGATCAAATACCTTTATTTATTTGAGCTGTAGGAATTACTGCTCTTCTTTTACTTCTCTCATTACCTGTTTTAGCAGGAGCTATTACCATACTTCTTACTGATCGAAATTTAAATACATCATTTTTTGATCCTGCAGGAGGAGGAGATCCTATTTTATATCAACATTTATTTTGATTTTTTGGGCATCCAGAAGTTTATATTTTAATTTTACCAGGATTTGGTATAATTTCTCATATTATTTCTCAAGAAAGTGGTAAAAAAGAAACTTTTGGATGTTTAGGAATAATTTATGCTATATTAGCAATTGGATTATTAGGTTTTATTGTTTGAGCTCATCATATATTTACTGTAGGAATAGATATTGATACTCGAG
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Widespread and abundant.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: D : Unthreatened throughout its range, communities may be threatened in minor portions of the range or degree of variation falls within natural variation

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Management

Global Protection: Many to very many (13 to >40) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

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Wikipedia

Hermeuptychia sosybius

The Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius) is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family. It is found from southern New Jersey south along the coast to southern Florida, west to south-eastern Kansas, central Oklahoma and central Texas. It is also found in Mexico.[2]

Life history of H. sosybius. USA: TX: Brazoria County, Bar-X Ranch, Rd. 971N, 29.13252 -95.58340, ex ovum ex ♀ collected on 4-Mar-2000, except o, which is TX: Wise Co., LBJ National Grassland. a ovum, 6-Mar-2000 b–d 1st instars, photographed on 14- 14- & 16-Mar-2000, respectively e–g 2nd instars photographed on 21- 19- & 21-Mar-2000 e, f are just after molt, shed larval skins are behind and 1st instar head capsule (black) is on the left in e, f is in a curled position adopted when disturbed h pre-molt quiescent 2nd instar larvae in a typical “head-to-head” resting position, 24-Mar-2000 i–j 3rd instars, 24- & 27-Mar- 2000 k–l 4th (ultimate) instars, ♂♂, 3- & 6-Apr-2000 l close to pupation, note the color and shape change m prepupa, 6-Apr-2000 n–p pupae, 9-Apr-2000, 8-Aug-1998, & 17-Apr-2000 o is from Wise Co., wing color is starting to develop p near eclosion, dark adult is seen through semi-transparent pupal cuticle. Most images show different individuals. Images a–g are enlarged 2 times (scale on f) compared to the rest (scale on l)

The wingspan is 32–38 mm. The upperside is brown without markings. The underside is also brown, but with small eyespots rimmed with yellow on both wings. They feed on sap and rotting fruit.

The larvae feed on various Poaceae species, including Axonopus compressus, Eremochloa ophiuroides, Stenotaphrum secundatum and Poa pratensis.

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Member of the confusing "HERMES complex": difficult to distinguish from H. hermes, often considered conspecific with it.

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