Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Baja California chorus frog

The Baja California chorus frog (Pseudacris hypochondriaca) is a species of treefrog of Western North America. The species was formerly considered the part of the Pacific chorus frog (Pesudacris regilla), but split and raised to species status in 2006. The species ranges from the West Coast of the United States from Baja California through southern California. Individuals live from sea level to more than 10,000 feet in many types of habitats, reproducing in aquatic settings. They occur in shades of greens or browns and can change colors over periods of hours and weeks.

Taxonomy[edit]

The naming of this frog has a very confusing history. These frogs have long been known as Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla or Hyla regilla). Then, in 2006, Recuero et al. split that taxonomic concept into three species based on mitochondrial DNA comparisons.[1] Recuero et al. attached the name Pseudacris regilla to the northern species, renaming the central species the Sierran tree frog (Pseudacris sierra) and the southern piece the Baja California tree frog (Pseudacris hypochondriaca). Because the paper provided no maps or discussion of how to diagnose the species, it has been an extremely controversial taxonomic revision,[2] but has been incorporated into Amphibian Species of the World 6.0.[3] The taxonomic confusion introduced by this name change means that much of the information about Pseudacris hypochondriaca is attached to the name1 "Pseudacris regilla".

References[edit]

  1. ^ Recuero, Ernesto; Martínez-Solano, Íñigo; Parra-Olea, Gabriela; García-París, Mario (2006). "Phylogeography of Pseudacris regilla (Anura: Hylidae) in western North America, with a proposal for a new taxonomic rearrangement". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 39 (2): 293–304. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2005.10.011. 
  2. ^ Dodd, C. K., Jr. 2013. Frogs of the United States and Canada. Volume 1. xxxi + 460.
  3. ^ "Amphibian Species of the World 6.0". 06-04-2014. 


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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Recuero et al. (2006) examined patterns of mtDNA variation (including new samples and additional samples presented by Ripplinger and Wagner 2004) and reviewed available allozyme data for Pseudacris regilla (sensu lato). They concluded that P. regilla should be partitioned into three species, P. regilla, P. sierra, and P. hypochondriaca (the original proposal included different names based on taxonomic errors that were subsequently corrected). The authors did not provide detailed maps or descriptions of the ranges of the three proposed species and did not describe the contact zones between P. sierra and the other two species.

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