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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 27248 specimens in 22 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 9768 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 3300
  Temperature range (°C): -2.045 - 29.468
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.030 - 34.037
  Salinity (PPS): 17.940 - 38.049
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.756 - 9.116
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.046 - 2.366
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.648 - 116.089

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 3300

Temperature range (°C): -2.045 - 29.468

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.030 - 34.037

Salinity (PPS): 17.940 - 38.049

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.756 - 9.116

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.046 - 2.366

Silicate (umol/l): 0.648 - 116.089
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Moving parts are lubricated: diatoms
 

Moving parts of diatoms may be lubricated with unique lubricants or other techniques yet to be discovered.

   
  "Ille C. Gebeshuber, Herbert Stachelberger, and Manfred Drack suggest that the study of diatoms will reveal solutions to lubrication problems at the micro and nanoscale. Three diatoms, Pseudonitzschia sp., Bacillaria paxillifer (aka B. paradoxa) and Ellerbeckia arenaria, especially warrant further study. The first two actively move, indicating some sort of lubrication exists. Entire colonies of five to 30 cells of Bacillaria paxillifer expand and contract rhythmically and are coordinated. String-like cell colonies of Ellerbeckia arenaria live in waterfalls.  They can reversibly be elongated by about one third of their original length. They might have solved their lubrication problems with techniques yet unknown to engineers. The authors mention other diatoms that might be useful to study." (Courtesy of the Biomimicry Guild)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Gebeshuber IC; Stachelberger H; Drack M. 2005. Diatom bionanotribology--biological surfaces in relative motion: their design, friction, wear and lubrication. Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 5(1): 79-87.
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© The Biomimicry Institute

Source: AskNature

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:220
Specimens with Sequences:147
Specimens with Barcodes:2
Species:24
Species With Barcodes:24
Public Records:141
Public Species:24
Public BINs:1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Pseudo-nitzschia

The genus Pseudo-nitzschia includes several species of diatoms known to produce the neurotoxin known as domoic acid, a toxin that is responsible for the human illness called amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP). This genus of phytoplankton is known to form harmful algal blooms in coastal waters of Canada, California, Oregon, Washington State, Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Central America, and South America.

The general biology, physiology, toxicity and distribution of Pseudo-nitzschia species is reviewed in Bates and Trainer (2006),[1] Trainer et al. (2008),[2] Lelong et al. (2012) [3] and Trainer et al. (2012).[4]

Up until 1994, the genus was known as Nitzschia, but was changed to Pseudo-nitzschia because of the ability to form chains of cells with overlapping tips as well as other minor morphological differences.[5] The nomenclatural history is given in Hasle (1995)[6] and Bates (2000).[7]

Known species of Pseudo-nitzschia (44):

Light and electron microscope images of Pseudo-nitzschia species are shown at the Nordic Microalgae website.

Pseudo-nitzschia species that have been shown to produce domoic acid (16), although not all strains are toxigenic:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bates, S.S. and V.L. Trainer. 2006. The ecology of harmful diatoms. In: E. Granéli an d J. Turner [eds.] Ecology of harmful algae. Ecological Studies, Vol. 189. Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, p. 81-93. PDF; 181 KB
  2. ^ Trainer, V.L., B.M. Hickey, and S.S. Bates. 2008. Toxic diatoms. In: P.J. Walsh, S.L. Smith, L.E. Fleming, H. Solo-Gabriele, and W.H. Gerwick [eds.], Oceans and human health: risks and remedies from the sea. Elsevier Science Publishers, New York, p. 219-237. PDF 2.7 MB
  3. ^ Lelong, A., H. Hégaret, P. Soudant, and S.S. Bates. 2012. Pseudo-nitzschia (Bacillariophyceae) species, domoic acid and amnesic shellfish poisoning: revisiting previous paradigms. Phycologia 51: 168-216. PDF; 1.8 MB
  4. ^ Trainer, V.L., S.S. Bates, N. Lundholm, A.E. Thessen, W.P. Cochlan, N.G. Adams, and C.G. Trick. 2012. Pseudo-nitzschia physiological ecology, phylogeny, toxicity, monitoring and impacts on ecosystem health. Harmful Algae 14: 271–300. Publisher's abstract and link to PDF file
  5. ^ Hasle, G.R. 1994. Pseudo-nitzschia as a genus distinct from Nitzschia (Bacillariophyceae). J. Phycol. 30: 1036-1039. [1]
  6. ^ Hasle, G.R. 1995. Pseudo-nitzschia pungens and P. multiseries (Bacillariophyceae): nomenclatural history, morphology, and distribution. J. Phycol. 31: 428-435. [2]
  7. ^ Bates, S.S. 2000. Domoic-acid-producing diatoms: another genus added! J. Phycol. 36: 978-983. [3]
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