Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (20,000-2,500,000 square km (about 8000-1,000,000 square miles)) Mideastern to northeastern North America: A substantial total known range from Cape Breton Island in the east to northern New Brunswick, west to Tennessee, and south to South Carolina (Walker 1953, Westfall and May 1996, Brunelle 1997).

Area approximately 1,000 x 2,300 kilometers = 2,300,000 square kilometers (approximately 600 x 1,400 miles = 840,000 square miles).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Lotic. Overall habitat is clear rivers and streams of generally greater than approximately 2 meters (7 feet) width with moderate to strong current over clean gravel and cobbles on comparatively productive soils. Landform required to promote a strong current in small to moderate running waters generally has moderate to considerable relief, from hills to mountains.

The microhabitat (sub-EO) is areas of surface-streaming macrophytes (SPARGANIUM SPP., Burreed, and others) in settle points (rarely areas with bank vegetation streaming in the water surface) and sun-lit marginal vegetation (ALNUS SPP., Alders, MYRICACEAE, Sweet Gale and relatives, and others).

Eggs are laid within plant tissues in the surface-streaming vegetation and the establishment of male territorial mating arenas there, plus development of larvae on vegetation. Walker (1958) suggests an association with OPHIOGOMPHUS ASPERSUS and it is also frequently found with O. MAINENSIS.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 - 300

Comments: Based on inventory data from the Acadian Region, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Virginia, there could be as many as 250 occurrences in these states/provinces. This number is likely an underestimate when you consider the areas that have not been inventoried. Surveys in Maine (Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife 1997, 1998) and in Nova Scotia since the 1980s (T. Herman, P.M. Brunelle) have located many occurrences (approximately 40) where the species has previously been perceived as rare and interesting.

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Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

Comments: Average population of certainly more than 100 specimens in all lifestages at each occurrence. The species appears to be less abundant than congenerics Calopteryx aequabilis and Calopteryx maculata, but this may be a function of its concentration at its apparently obligate nuptial/ovipositing microhabitat. Its habitat type is abundant throughout much of the species' range; viable occurrences are therefore likely common, though more so in areas of less development. Greatest abundance of the species appears to be in Maine and New Brunswick.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Uncommon but not rare, a moderately large range from a regional perspective, but comparatively small from a global perspective.

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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments: Increased encounter recently has been a result of increased survey. No abundance changes not attributable to flight season have been noted.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: D : Unthreatened throughout its range, communities may be threatened in minor portions of the range or degree of variation falls within natural variation

Comments: Current threats appear minor over much of the species' range. Potential threats of habitat degradation are the impoundment of running waters by human activities such as poorly drained roads, damming, and also natural activities such as beaver damming (often a transient effect), channelization leading to scour of microhabitats, toxic or organic pollution, introduction of exotic species.

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Management

Biological Research Needs: There are no major taxonomic or morphological questions requiring study that this author is aware of.

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Global Protection: Few to several (1-12) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

Comments: Occurrences are protected in Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia, Mount Carleton Provincial Park, New Brunswick, and Baxter State Park, Maine. Many occurrences in New York fall within the "protected" area of the Adirondack Park. None of the known occurrences in these protected areas have shown great abundance of the species.

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Wikipedia

Superb Jewelwing

The Superb Jewelwing[1] (Calopteryx amata) is found in Georgia and West Virginia through New England to New Brunswick in Canada. Of all members of the damselfly family Calopterygidae this species has the most narrow wings. It is overall a large species of damselflies, growing to lengths of 49–61 mm. C. amata damselflies perch on alders and other riverside plants. They dart out to capture prey, then return to their perch. The Superb Jewelwing flight season is mid May to late July. This damselfly is a threatened species in New Jersey.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lam, Ed. (2004) Damselflies of the Northeast. Forest Hills, NY: Biodiversity Press, p.16.
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