Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Aeshna caerulea is a boreal species that is numerous in Eurasias polar regions, post-glacial relicts in Scotland, central European mountains (above 1,000 m) and the Caucasus.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species can be found in alpine and arctic moors, heaths and tundra. It breeds in bog pools and sedge swamps, and is seldom found below 1,000 m in the Alps.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Clausnitzer, V.

Reviewer/s
Kalkman, V. & Suhling. F. (Odonata Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Though locally scarce and declining, particularly in central Europe, as a post-glacial relict and thus listed in threat categories of regional red lists, Aeshna caerulea is widespread in the Eurasia's polar region.
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Population

Population
There is no information known on the population size or trend of this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
This species is affected by habitat destruction; the clear-cutting of forests, changes in management regimes of non-agricultural based land and infrastructure development, especially tourism. Possible future threats include atmospheric pollution such as global warming.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are a number of conservation measures already implemented for Aeshna caerulea, including monitoring its population trends and range. However restoration and conservation of its habitat are required as it is declining in some areas of its range, particularly in central Europe.
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Wikipedia

Azure hawker

The azure hawker (Aeshna caerulea) is one of the smaller species of hawker dragonflies, (family Aeshnidae). The flight period is from late May to August

It is 62 mm long. Both sexes have azure blue spots on each abdominal segment and the thorax also has azure markings. The markings on the male are brighter and more conspicuous than in the female. The female also has a brown colour form.[2]

This species flies in sunshine, and will also bask on stones or tree trunks. It shelters in heather or similar low vegetation in dull weather. Unique to this species is that the blue of the male pales to a more grey colour at lower temperatures.[3]

The species is widespread in the Eurasian polar region.[1] In Great Britain, the azure hawker occurs only in Scotland.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Clausnitzer, V. (2007). "Aeshna caerulea". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 29 September 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Azure Hawker". British Dragonfly Society. Retrieved 29 September 2011. 
  3. ^ Willet, Jonathan (April 2013). "The Azure Hawker Aeshna caerulea (Ström)". Journal of the British Dragonfly Society 29: 5. 
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