Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Formerly occurred in the Arabian Peninsula from Kuwait to the borders of Saudi Arabia and Yemen (Mallon and Kingswood 2001). Most records are from the western part of Saudi Arabia. Reports of occurrence in Iraq are unconfirmed and doubtful (Mallon and Kingswood 2001). A record from Amman, Jordan, cited by Harrison and Bates (1991) relates to a specimen found in archaeological excavations and the species was not included in the list of antelopes occurring in the country by Kiwan et al. (2001).
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Historic Range:
Israel, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, Arabian Peninsula

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Formerly occurred on gravel and sandy plains (Harrison and Bates 1991). It was a species of open Acacia country, occurring singly or in groups of up to 20.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EX
Extinct

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Mallon, D.P. (Antelope Red List Authority) & Hoffmann, M. (Global Mammal Assessment)

Contributor/s

Justification
There have been no specimens collected or sightings of G. saudiya for several decades despite frequent surveys in areas of former habitat. Recent genetic analysis of all reported specimens of G. saudiya in captive collections has shown that these represent different species or hybrids (Hammond et al. 2001). Systematic investigations of captive collections throughout the Arabian Peninsula have failed to locate any captive individuals.

History
  • 2003
    Extinct in the Wild
    (IUCN 2003)
  • 2003
    Extinct in the Wild
  • 1996
    Extinct in the Wild
  • 1996
    Extinct in the Wild
  • 1994
    Extinct?
    (Groombridge 1994)
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Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 07/27/1979
Lead Region: Foreign (Region 10) 
Where Listed: Israel, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, Arabian Peninsula


Population detail:

Population location: Israel, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, Arabian Peninsula
Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Gazella saudiya, see its USFWS Species Profile

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Population

Population
It was reported to be Extinct in the wild in the 1980s and subsquent reports of captive specimens in collections in the Arabian Peninsula have been shown to refer to other taxa or to hybrids (Hammond et al. 2001).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Hammond et al. (2001) showed that three captive populations of putative G. saudiya are of little relevance to future conservation of the taxon and that surveys of privately owned populations provided no evidence of surviving G. saudiya.
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Wikipedia

Saudi gazelle

The Saudi gazelle, Gazella saudiya, is an extinct species of gazelle once found in the Arabian peninsula. It is extinct due to hunting by humans in its native lands.[1] It was declared to be extinct in 2008, but it is likely to have disappeared before then.

The Saudi gazelle once lived in gravel and sandy plains with acacias of the northern and western Arabian peninsula from Kuwait to Yemen, with most of the records coming from western Saudi Arabia. It was found singly or in groups up to 20.[1]

The Saudi gazelle was formerly seen as a subspecies of the Dorcas gazelle, which is why its decline and extinction received so little attention from conservationists. Recent genetic studies proved its position as a separate species. Apart from genetic differences, the Saudi gazelle also had shorter legs than the Dorcas gazelle and was lighter in color.[2]

The species was always rare and declining due to excessive hunting; it has not been seen for a few decades, and was declared to be extinct in the wild in 1980. Recent genetic analysis of all reported specimens of G. saudiya in captive collections has shown these represent different species or hybrids.[1][3] Despite frequent surveys attempting to find pure Saudi gazelles in the wild and privately owned, no evidence of surviving individuals has been found. The Saudi gazelle was officially declared extinct by the IUCN in 2008.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group (2008). Gazella saudiya. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 5 January 2009.
  2. ^ The Extinction Website - Species Info - Saudi Gazelle
  3. ^ Hammond, Robert L., Macasero, William, Flores, Benito, Mohammed, Osama B., Wacher, Tim & Bruford, Michael W. (2001). Phylogenetic Reanalysis of the Saudi Gazelle and Its Implications for Conservation. Conservation Biology 15 (4), 1123-1133.
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