Ecology

Associations

Known predators

  • L. Saldanha, Estudio Ambiental do Estuario do Tejo, Publ. no. 5(4) (CNA/Tejo, Lisbon, 1980).
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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Known prey organisms

Cirratulidae (Deposit-feeding polychaetes) preys on:
detritus
algae
bacteria
Microfauna
meiofauna

Based on studies in:
Portugal (Estuarine)
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • L. Saldanha, Estudio Ambiental do Estuario do Tejo, Publ. no. 5(4) (CNA/Tejo, Lisbon, 1980).
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Classification

Placed under Spionida
  • Fauchald, K. 1977. The polychaete worms, definitions and keys to the orders, families and genera. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County: Los Angeles, CA (USA) Science Series 28:1-188
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 238
Specimens with Sequences: 177
Specimens with Barcodes: 165
Species: 37
Species With Barcodes: 25
Public Records: 103
Public Species: 13
Public BINs: 19
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Cirratulidae

Cirratulidae is a family of marine polychaete worms. Members of the family are found worldwide, mostly living in mud or rock crevices.[2] Most are deposit feeders, but some graze on algae or are suspension feeders.[1]

Description[edit]

Cirratulids vary in size from one to twenty centimetres long. They are mostly burrowers in soft sediments but some live in rock crevices. The head is conical or wedge-shaped and has no antennae. The body is generally cylindrical, tapering at both ends. Cirratulids are characterised by a large number of simple elongate filaments along the body. Some of these occur as an anterior cluster of tentacles, grooved for deposit-feeding, but the majority, the branchiae, are found one pair per segment, and do not have grooves. The chaetae (bristles) are simple capillaries, usually with hooks, and emerge directly from the body wall. There are no anal cirri (slender sensory appendages). The worm is usually buried with only the writhing branchial filaments visible.[2][3] Some cirratulids can build tubes of calcium carbonate.[4]

When alive, the body, branchiae and tentacular filaments are often red, orange or yellow, though species of Dodecaceria are dark green or black. Terebellidae and other worm families may superficially look similar to cirratulids with a mass of filaments. However, in terebellids, the filaments arise from the mouth or are restricted to the anterior three segments, whereas cirratulid branchiae occur throughout the body, one pair per segment.[5]

Taxonomy[edit]

The genera are poorly defined and Blake undertook a partial revision in 1996. He divided them into three groups, the multi-tentaculate genera such as Cirratulus and Cirriformia, the bi-tentaculate soft-substrate genera such as Caulleriella, Chaetozone, Tharyx and the bi-tentaculate hard substrate genera such as Dodecaceria.[6]

There is considerable confusion as to the phylogenetic relationships in the family and Blake suggests that many species with global distributions will be found to represent species complexes within which some species are presently undescribed.[6]

Genera[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b World Register of Marine Species
  2. ^ a b Marine Species Identification Portal
  3. ^ Cirratulidae
  4. ^ Vinn, O. (2009). "The ultrastructure of calcareous cirratulid (Polychaeta, Annelida) tubes". Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences 58 (2): 153–156. doi:10.3176/earth.2009.2.06. Retrieved 2012-09-16. 
  5. ^ Polychaetes:Cirratulidae
  6. ^ a b Blake, J.A. (1996). Family Cirratulidae Ryckholdt, 1851. pp. 263-384 in Blake, J.A., Hilbig, B. & Scott, P.H. (eds) The Annelida. Part 3 Polychaeta: Orbiniidae to Cossuridae. Vol. 6. Taxonomic Atlas of the Benthic Fauna of the Santa Maria Basin and western Santa Barbara Channel. Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History : Santa Barbara, California
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