Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is distributed throughout the Mediterranean and in the Eastern Atlantic (Holthuis 1991). In the Eastern Atlantic, it is known from the south coast of the United Kingdom down to the Canary Islands, and includes the Azores and Madeira (Holthuis 1991).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found at depths of 4-50 m (Holthuis 1991). This species inhabits mud and rock substrates, but can also be found in fields of Posidonia species (Holthuis 1991). It has also been found in artificial reefs and areas designated to the 'protection of the Posidonia meadows from illegal trawling and, if possible, restore it to its past size' (Relini et al. 2007).

Systems
  • Marine
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Depth range based on 2 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 3 - 23

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 3 - 23
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Dispersal

Depth range

range from 4 to 50m
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1991. FAO species catalogue. Vol 13. Marine lobsters of the world. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries known to date. FAO fisheries Synopsis. 125 (13):292 p.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Scyllarus arctus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 22
Specimens with Barcodes: 22
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Scyllarus arctus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.   Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.  Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

GGGATAGTTGGAACTTCATTA---AGTCTAATTATCCGAGCCGAATTAGGCCAACCAGGGAGATTAATTGGCGAC---GATCAAATCTACAATGTGGTAGTCACGGCCCACGCATTTATTATAATTTTCTTCATAGTAATACCAATTATAATCGGAGGATTTGGAAATTGATTAGTACCTTTAATA---TTAGGAGCCCCAGATATGGCTTTTCCCCGAATAAATAACATAAGATTTTGGCTCCTACCACCTGCTCTTACCCTTCTCCTTTCAAGGGGAATAGTTGAAAGGGGAGTTGGGACTGGGTGAACCGTTTACCCACCCTTAGCAGCAGCCGTAGCCCACGCGGGCGCCTCAGTAGACATAGGA---ATTTTCTCCCTACATTTGGCGGGGGTGTCTTCCATTCTAGGGGCCGTTAATTTCATAACAACCGTTATTAATATACGACCAGCAGGAATGTCTATAGACCATATACCTCTATTTGTTTGATCTGTTTTCATTACTGCAATCTTACTCCTCCTATCACTTCCGGTATTAGCAGGG---GCAATTACTATGCTCTTAACCGATCGAAATTTAAACACTTCTTTTTTTGACCCTGCTGGGGGAGGAGATCCTGTCCTATACCAACACCTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Butler, M., MacDiarmid, A., Wahle, R., Cockcroft, A. & Chan, T.Y.

Reviewer/s
Collen, B., Livingstone, S. & Richman, N.

Contributor/s
Batchelor, A., De Silva, R., Dyer, E., Kasthala, G., Lutz, M.L., McGuinness, S., Milligan, H.T., Soulsby, A.-M. & Whitton, F.

Justification

Scyllarus arctus has a wide distribution. It is harvested throughout its range, and known to be over-exploited locally in some regions. Although there have been these declines, the ecological characteristics of slipper lobsters make them resistant to extinction as they are highly fecund with well connected populations via long-lived larvae. Monitoring of harvest levels should be carried out to check for possible increases in fishing, together with stricter enforcement of current management regimes. This species is listed as Least Concern.

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Population

Population

There is no overall population information available for this species. However, this species has experienced a local decline in Cape Creus, Spain, where it was previously caught in small quantities, but now it is considered to be 'very rare' (Linares 2008 in Lloret and Riera 2008). In contrast, it is described as one of the common marine species off the Lebanese coast (Majdalani 2004).


Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
This species is threatened locally by habitat loss due to decreasing Posidonia fields, and also by over-fishing by hand in some areas (Holthuis 1991, Relini et al. 2007), but this is not considered a major threat to the species over its entire range.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

This species has been listed by the Council of Europe as a protected species in the Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (Council of Europe 1979).

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Wikipedia

Scyllarus arctus

Scyllarus arctus is a species of slipper lobster which lives in the Mediterranean Sea and eastern Atlantic Ocean. It is uncommon in British and Irish waters, but a number of English-language vernacular names have been applied, including small European locust lobster,[2] lesser slipper lobster[3] and broad lobster.[4]

Contents

Distribution

S. arctus is found throughout the Mediterranean Sea, and in eastern parts of the Atlantic Ocean, from the Azores,[3] Madeira and the Canary Islands as far north as the English Channel.[5] The species is rare north of the Bay of Biscay; several specimens have been seen in British waters, but nonetheless, S. arctus is rarer in Britain than the giant squid, Architeuthis dux.[6] Until 1960, S. arctus was thought to be the only species of Scyllarus in the Mediterranean Sea, but then it was realised that the lesser known Scyllarus pygmaeus is also present throughout much of the Mediterranean Sea.[7]

Description

Scyllarus arctus may reach up to 16 centimetres (6.3 in) long, although sizes of 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) are more typical. It is reddish-brown in colour, with a dark brown spot in the centre of each abdominal somite, although this is not sharply defined. The pereiopods have a dark blue ring around each segment.[5] It can be told apart from its close relative Scyllarus pygmaeus, which lives sympatrically with S. arctus, chiefly by its larger size, but also by other features such as the shape of a tubercle on the last thoracic sternite; this is flattened in S. arctus, but conical in S. pygmaeus.[7] S. arctus has among the smallest measured genome sizes in the Order Decapoda, at less than a third of that seen in the related genus Scyllarides.[8]

Ecology

S. arctus is susceptible to white spot syndrome,[9] and is predated upon by a wide range of demersal fish.[10] It lives at depths of 4–50 m on muddy or rocky substrates, and in Posidonia meadows. It is the subject of small scale fishery, but its scarcity and its small size make it an unattractive target.[5]

References

  1. ^ M. Butler, A. MacDiarmid, R. Wahle, A. Cockcroft & T. Y. Chan (2009). "Scyllarus arctus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 3.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/169949. Retrieved August 25, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "Scyllarus arctus – small European locust lobster". SeaLifeBase. November 7, 2008. http://www.sealifebase.org/summary/SpeciesSummary.php?id=26136.
  3. ^ a b "Scyllarus arctus (Linnaeus, 1758)". Azorean Biodiversity Portal. Universidade dos Açores. http://www.azoresbioportal.angra.uac.pt/listagens.php?lang=en&sstr=5&dis=azores&fld=CodigoEspecie&id=I00542.
  4. ^ John Edward Gray (1850). "Part IV. Crustacea". List of the specimens of British animals in the collection of the British Museum. British Museum. http://decapoda.nhm.org/pdfs/24179/24179.pdf.
  5. ^ a b c Lipke Holthuis (1990). "Scyllarus arctus". Marine Lobsters of the World. FAO Fisheries Series. http://nlbif.eti.uva.nl/bis/lobsters.php?selected=beschrijving&menuentry=soorten&id=198.
  6. ^ Doug Henderson (2001-12-21). "Slipper lobster (Scyllarus arctus)". British Marine Wildlife News. http://www.glaucus.org.uk/Scyllarus_arctus.txt.
  7. ^ a b C. Lewinsohn (1974). "The occurrence of Scyllarus pygmaeus (Bate) in the eastern Mediterranean (Deacpoda, Scyllaridae)". Crustaceana 27 (1): 43–46. doi:10.1163/156854074X00217. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/cr/1974/00000027/00000001/art00007.
  8. ^ A. M. Deiana, A. Cau, E. Coluccia, R. Cannas, A. Milia, S. Salvadori & A. Libertini (1999). "Genome size and AT-DNA content in thirteen species of Decapoda". In F. R. Schram & J. C. von Vaupel Klein. Crustaceans and the Biodiversity Crisis: Proceedings of the Fourth International Crustacean Congress, 1998. Elsevier. pp. 981–985. ISBN 90-04-11387-8. http://flux.ve.ismar.cnr.it/ibm/html//acq/pdf_angelo/libDNAdecapod.pdf.
  9. ^ V. Corbel, Z. Zuprizal, C. Shi, Huang, Sumartono, J.-M. Arcier & J.-R. Bonami (2001). "Experimental infection of European crustaceans with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)". Journal of Fish Diseases 24 (7): 377–382. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2761.2001.00302.x. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118973404/abstract.
  10. ^ Alberto Serrano, Francisco Velasco, Ignacio Olaso & Francisco Saacutenchez (2003). "Macrobenthic crustaceans in the diet of demersal fish in the Bay of Biscay in relation to abundance in the environment". Sarsia 88 (1): 36–48. doi:10.1080/00364820308469. http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/35861823-31423371/content~db=all~content=a713607401~tab=content.

Further reading

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