Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Echinocereus rosei Wooton & Standl.
Catalog Number: US 535093
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): P. C. Standley
Year Collected: 1907
Locality: Dona Ana, New Mexico, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Wooton, E. O. & Standley, P. C. 1915. Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 19: 457.
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Type collection for Echinocereus neomexicanus Standl.
Catalog Number: US 1821069
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): P. C. Standley
Year Collected: 1907
Locality: Dona Ana, New Mexico, United States, North America
  • Type collection: Standley, P. C. 1908. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 35: 87.
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Isotype for Echinocereus canyonensis Clover & Jotter
Catalog Number: US 2346041
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. U. Clover & M. Jotter
Year Collected: 1938
Locality: Arizona, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Clover, E. U. & Jotter, M. L. 1941. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 68: 417.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: This plant is abundant and wide-ranging in southwestern U.S. in California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas (Kartesz 1999; Benton 1982). It occurs in six eastern counties in Nevada, 14 counties in Arizona, 23 counties in New Mexico, 15 counties in Colorado, and 21 counties in Utah (Kartesz 2003 draft). Welsh (et al. 1993) states that this plant occurs in Mexico also, south to Durango (Benton 1982).

This plant inhabits rocky or grassy hillsides, ledges, and canyons; mostly on igneous rocks at 1050-2400 m and occurs in Rocky Mountain montane forest, juniper-pinyon woodlands, southwestern oak woodland, sagebrush desert, Navajoan Desert, and on the edges of desert grassland and Great Plains grasslands (Benton 1982).

In California, it is occasional in Cushenberry Canyon, Joshua Tree National Monument, Clark Mountains (Munz 1974), and in New York Mountains, Mojave Desert region in San Bernandino County (Benson 1982). In Utah, this plant is broadly distributed in blackbrush, ephedra, sagebrush, pinyon-juniper, mountain brush, and aspen communities at 975 to 2562 m in Beaver, Carbon, Daggett, Duchesne, Emery, Garfield, Grand, Iron, Juab, Kane, Millard, Piute, Salt Lake, San Juan, Sanpete, Sevier, Tooele, Uintah, Utah, Washington, and Wayne counties (Welsh et al. 1993). In New Mexico, it is widespread on rocky slopes and canyons, often in igenous soils 4000-9000 ft (Martin and Hutchins 1981). It occurs in all higher areas, but not on Great Plains or in deserts. In Nevada, this plant occurs in Antelope Mountains, Eureka County, and in southeast Nye County and adjacent Lincoln County. In Colorado, it occurs from the Colorado River drainage to Pueblo County and south. In Arizona, it occurs everywhere except in the lower deserts of Yuma, Maricopa, western Pinal, and western Pima counties. In Texas, this plant occurs in central and western parts of the state in the trans-Pecos region and in granitic areas of the Edwards Plateau and its escarpment as far east as Granite Mountain, Burnet County, and Hays County. In Mexico, it is found especially in the region of the Sierra Madre Occidental, as far south as Durango and San Luis Potosi. (Benton 1982)

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Wikipedia

Echinocereus × neomexicanus

Echinocereus × neomexicanus is a natural hybrid between Echinocereus coccineus subsp. rosei and Echinocereus viridiflorus subsp. chloranthus. Lyman Benson confused the plant with Echinocereus coccineus subsp. rosei under the name Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. neomexicanus . The plant was originally described by Paul Carpenter Standley in Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 35:87 (1908) based on a specimen growing in the cactus garden of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts from among hundreds of specimens he had collected from the mesa west of the Organ Mountains.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Benson, Lyman: Cacti of the United States and Canada, (1982).
  • Benson, Lyman: The Cacti of Arizona, ed 3, (1969) p. 449.
  • Blum, Lange, Rischer & Rutow: Echinocereus, (1998) p. 129.
  • Powell, A. Michael & James F. Weedin: Cacti of the Trans-Pecos and Adjacent Areas, (2004) p. 211.
  • Standley, Paul C. : "Some Echinocerei of New Mexico". Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 35:87 (1908).
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: The CITES category 2 is applied to E. triglochidiatus var. melanacanthus, which Kartesz has lumped into E. coccineus var. coccineus.

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