Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from Australia: Queensland [Latitude 28oS] south to Western Australia near Geraldton (Holthuis 1991).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found on soft substrates such as clay, sand and mud in which they burrow. They can be found at a depth range of 15 - 650 m, but are most common at 150 m (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries 2009). Fecundity ranges from 5,000 - 37,000 eggs (Stewart et al. 1997). This is a long-lived species to up to 18 years. It is relatively sedentary with recaptures within 5 km after 10 years (Stewart 2003).

Systems
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 36 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 15 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 10 - 241.402
  Temperature range (°C): 13.728 - 24.292
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.893 - 6.497
  Salinity (PPS): 35.233 - 35.724
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.666 - 5.672
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.151 - 0.452
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.009 - 2.773

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 10 - 241.402

Temperature range (°C): 13.728 - 24.292

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.893 - 6.497

Salinity (PPS): 35.233 - 35.724

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.666 - 5.672

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.151 - 0.452

Silicate (umol/l): 1.009 - 2.773
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Dispersal

Depth range

depth range from 40 to 250m
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1991. FAO species catalogue. Vol 13. Marine lobsters of the world. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries known to date. FAO fisheries Synopsis. 125 (13):292 p.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Ibacus peronii

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.

Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNCTATATTTTATCTTCGGAGCTTGAGCAGGAATAGTAGGAACTTCACTGAGATTAATCATTCGTGCTGAATTAGGACAACCAGGAAGACTAATTGGAGACGATCAAATTTATAATGTTGTGGTCACAGCTCATGCATTCGTCATAATTTTCTTTATAGTTATGCCCATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGTAATTGACTAGTTCCACTAATATTAGGGGCCCCAGATATGGCTTTCCCACGAATAAATAACATAAGATTTTGGTTGCTTCCACCTTCTTTAACTCTTCTTCTATCAAGAGGAATAGTAGAAAGAGGTGTAGGAACAGGATGGACCGTGTATCCCCCTCTAGCGGCTGCTGTCGCTCACGCTGGGGCATCTGTAGACCTAGGTATTTTTTCTCTTCACCTAGCAGGAGTTTCCTCAATTCTAGGAGCAGTAAATTTTATGACAACTGTAATCAATATACGATCAACCGGCATAACCATAGACCGTATGCCCCTATTTGTCTGATCTGTTTTTATTACCGCAATTTTACTTCTTTTATCTTTACCTGTTTTAGCAGGAGCAATTACTATACTTTTAACAGACCGAAACTTAAACCCATCTTTTTTCGACCCAGCAGGAGGGGGCGACCCAGTTCTTTACCAGCATCCTTTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ibacus peronii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Butler, M., MacDiarmid, A. & Cockcroft, A.

Reviewer/s
Collen, B., Livingstone, S. & Richman, N.

Contributor/s
Batchelor, A., De Silva, R., Dyer, E., Kasthala, G., Lutz, M.L., McGuinness, S., Milligan, H.T., Soulsby, A.-M. & Whitton, F.

Justification
Ibacus peronii has been assessed as Data Deficient. There are concerns that the population maybe over-exploited due to declining landings and reduced size of individuals, however catch per unit effort data suggests that the population is stable. Further research is needed to determine if CPUE is an appropriate index of abundance for this species.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
This is a common species. This species is caught regularly in prawn trawl fisheries in Australia.

This species is commercially harvested throughout its range. It is taken in trawls and sold fresh in markets (Holthuis 1991, Haddy 2007). Landings are said to have declined significantly over the last 5 years (Stewart 2005). Historically, this species was by-catch of the prawn fishery; however in recent years in response to the increased consumer demand, this species is now targeted by fishers. The increased fishing effort has led to significant declines in the catch, and reduced average size of specimens (Stewart 2005; Stewart et al.1997). However, catch per unit effort data indicates that abundance may in fact be relatively stable (if taken as an index of abundance appropriate to the taxon). In 1990/1991 the catch of both this species and Ibacus chacei, totalled around 28 tonnes with an average of 3.885 kg/day. The catch peaked at around 85 tonnes in 1995/1996 with a daily harvest rate of 6.6 kg/day. The annual harvest declined again to 25 tonnes in 1999/2000 with a harvest rate of 1.85 kg/day but rose again to 76 tonnes in 2003/2004 and a harvest rate of 5 kg/day. In 2008/2009 the harvest rate was at a low of 16.7 tonnes but with a harvest rate of 5.33 kg/day (Stewart pers. comm. 2009) (Note: Ibacus peronii only makes up a small fraction of this 2 species catch). Much of the landings of this species are taken in New South Wales and Victoria (Haddy et al. 2007).

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
The main threat to this species is exploitation by fisheries. There has been a recent switch from this species being taken as by-catch, to a targeted fishery due to consumer demand.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Management of the fishery includes a ban on the taking of egg-bearing females, a minimum legal size limit of 50 mm carapace length which is based on their size at sexual maturity (Stewart, Kennelly and Hoegh-Guldberg 1997).

Further research is needed to clarify whether CPUE is an appropriate index of abundance for this species.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Ibacus peronii

Ibacus peronii, the Balmain bug or butterfly fan lobster, is a species of slipper lobster. It lives in shallow waters around Australia and is the subject of small-scale fishery. It is a flattened, reddish brown animal, up to 23 cm (9 in) long and 14 cm (6 in) wide, with flattened antennae and no claws.

Contents

Description

In common with other slipper lobsters, Ibacus peronii has a broad, flattened body and a large carapace.[2] The carapace is reddish brown,[3] and reaches lengths of 2–8 centimetres (0.8–3.1 in), with the whole animal able to reach a length of 23 cm (9 in),[4] and a width of 10–14 cm (3.9–5.5 in).[3] The antennae are also short and broad, and the flattened form of the whole animal allows it to partly bury itself in soft substrates.[2] There are no claws on the five pairs of legs. Captured animals typically weigh around 120 grams (4.2 oz), but the weight can range from 80 to 200 g (2.8 to 7.1 oz).[3]

The species is sometimes confused with the Moreton Bay bug, Thenus orientalis, but they can be distinguished by the placement of the eyes: the eyes of I. peronii are near the midline, while those of T. orientalis are at the margin of the carapace.[2]

Distribution and ecology

It is found at depths of 20–450 metres (66–1,480 ft) off the coast of Australia from Southport in Queensland to Geraldton in Western Australia.[4] A further population exists in Western Australia from Port Hedland to Broome.[3]

Ibacus peronii is nocturnal and feeds on algae and small crustaceans.[2] They often spend the daytime buried in sand or mud.[3]

Fishery

A cooked Balmain bug

Ibacus peronii is the most commercially important species in the genus Ibacus.[3] Only wild-caught Ibacus peronii are available, although some research into aquaculture is ongoing.[3] The fishery for I. peronii is focussed around New South Wales, where it is mainly caught as bycatch of trawling for fish and prawns. There is a peak in supply in January and February, and the price is highest in areas where it is caught, because of its increased familiarity and popularity there.[3] I. peronii is almost always available at fish markets in Sydney.[4]

The flesh of I. peronii is sometimes reported as tasting of garlic, which makes the species less desirable than the Moreton Bay bug, Thenus orientalis, for cooking.[4] Only the tail contains edible meat. Small individuals yield 30% meat, while larger animals, which have proportionally smaller tails, have lower yields.[3]

Naming

The species Ibacus peronii was described by William Elford Leach in 1815, based on material collected by François Péron. Péron had labelled the animal Scyllarus incisus, and had previously called it Scyllarus kingiensis.[5] Although the type locality was given simply as "New Holland" (now Australia), historical records demonstrate that the animal was caught off King Island, in the Bass Strait between Tasmania and the Australian mainland.[5]

Common names used in Australia for Ibacus peronii include Balmain bug, Eastern Balmain bug,[3] butterfly lobster, flapjack, Péron's Ibacus crab, sand crayfish, sand lobster, southern shovel-nosed lobster, prawn killer and squagga,[4] although the last two are not in current use.[6] The named preferred by the Food and Agriculture Organization is butterfly fan lobster.[4] Although it is most widely known as the "Balmain bug", three other species of Ibacus share that name.[6]

References

  1. ^ M. Butler, A. MacDiarmid & A. Cockcroft (2009). "Ibacus peronii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 3.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/169984. Retrieved 25 August 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d "Balmain Bug Ibacus peronii". New South Wales Department of Primary Industries. http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/saltwater/sw-species/balmain-bug. Retrieved 6 September 2010.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Balmain Bug". Sydney Fish Market. http://www.sydneyfishmarket.com.au/Information/SpeciesInfo/tabid/91/xmmid/620/xmid/70/Default.aspx. Retrieved 6 September 2010.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Lipke B. Holthuis (1991). "Ibacus peronii". FAO Species Catalogue, Volume 13. Marine Lobsters of the World. FAO Fisheries Synopsis No. 125. Food and Agriculture Organization. pp. 205–206. ISBN 92-5-103027-8. http://nlbif.eti.uva.nl/bis/lobsters.php?menuentry=soorten&id=191.
  5. ^ a b Lipke B. Holthuis (1996). "The scyllarid lobsters (Crustacea: Decapoda: Palinuridea) collected by F. Péron and C. A. Lesueur during the 1800–1804 expedition to Australia" (PDF). Zoologische Mededelingen 70 (18): 261–270. http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/149723.
  6. ^ a b Gary C. B. Poore & Shane T. Ahyong (2004). "Ibacus Leach, 1815". Marine decapod Crustacea of southern Australia: a guide to identification. CSIRO Publishing. pp. 211–212. ISBN 978-0-643-06906-0. http://books.google.com/books?id=ZZWnuGc0xlMC&pg=PA212.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!