Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This variety is found in the USA: Arizona (Coconino, Gila, Maricopa and Yavapai Co.).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Tree, Evergreen, Monoecious, Habit erect, Trees without or rarely having knees, Primary plant stem smooth, Tree with bark smooth, Tree with bark shaggy or peeling, Young shoots 3-dimensional, Buds not resinous, Leaves scale-like, Leaves opposite, Non-needle-like leaf margins entire, Leaf apex acute, Leaf apex obtuse, Leaves < 5 cm long, Leaves < 10 cm long, Leaves not blue-green, Outer leaf surface covered with resin, Scale leaves with raised glands, Scale leaf glands ruptured, Scale leaves overlapping, Twigs glabrous, Twigs not viscid, Twigs without peg-like projections or large fascicles after needles fall, Berry-like cones orange, Woody seed cones < 5 cm long, Bracts of seed cone included, Seeds blue, Seeds winged, Seeds equally winged, Seed wings narrower than body.
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Stephen C. Meyers

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Type Information

Possible type for Cupressus glabra Sudw.
Catalog Number: US 1583616
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): G. B. Sudworth
Year Collected: 1910
Locality: Coronado National Forest., Arizona, United States, North America
  • Possible type: Sudworth, G. B. 1910. Amer. Forests. 16: 88.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
In Pinyon-Juniper woodland with Pinus edulis, P. ponderosa, Juniperus deppeana, J. scopulorum, J. osteosperma; common in ravines or canyons among sandstone, slate or granite rock or on rocky slopes.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Hesperocyparis glabra

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hesperocyparis glabra

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Farjon, A.

Reviewer/s
Thomas, P.

Contributor/s

Justification
Despite the abundance of individuals and no evidence of decline, this variety has a small extent of occurrence well within the threshold for Endangered; its area of occupancy and number of locations also fall within these limits. It could become threatened if fires became more destructive in future, so Near Threatened seems to be an appropriate category (almost qualifies for listing under criteria B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii)).
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Population

Population
This variety appears to be locally common and stable.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
Probably the most numerous form of the species in the U.S.A., C. arizonica var. glabra is not at risk of extinction. This does not mean that its populations are not susceptible to fire, grazing by livestock and possibly other hazards such as alterations in groundwater tables. Proper management of these factors, while allowing for natural processes to take their course, is required.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Proper fire management, allowing fires to set off regeneration but not to destroy sub-populations, is the most important issue.
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Wikipedia

Cupressus glabra

Cupressus glabra, known as the Arizona Smooth Bark Cypress, is a species of conifer native to the American Southwest, with a range stretching over the canyons and slopes in a somewhat wide vicinity around Sedona, Arizona. It was first described by George Bishop Sudworth in 1910.[1]

It is distinguished from the closely related Cupressus arizonica, of which it is sometimes listed as a mere variety, by its very smooth, non-furrowed bark which can appear in shades of pink, cherry, and grey.

It is often seen in cultivation, as unlike Monterey Cypress, it has proved almost immune to Cypress Canker.

References[edit]

  • Wolf, C. B. & Wagener, W. E. (1948). The New World cypresses. El Aliso 1: 195-205.
  1. ^ International Organization for Plant Information (IOPI). "Plant Name Search Results" (HTML). International Plant Names Index. Retrieved 24 February 2010. 
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