Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Dudleya blochmaniae subsp. brevifolia (Moran) Moran:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Dudleya brevifolia (Moran) Moran:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: California: found in the northern part of San Diego, and from the Torrey Pines to Del Mar, i.e. Crest Canyon Preserve, La Jolla, Soledad Park and Carmel Mountain.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5

Comments: Eight occurrences but only a few viable.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: California state endemic, few occurrences, real threat from urbanization.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Comments: High urbanization threat.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Dudleya blochmaniae subsp. brevifolia

Dudleya blochmaniae subsp. brevifolia is a succulent plant known by the common name Short-leaved Liveforever or Short-leaved Dudleya. This plant is a rare subspecies of Dudleya blochmaniae with an extremely limited and endemic range in San Diego County, California.

Description [edit]

It grows into a somewhat erect, small (1–4 cm), cryptic, and corm-like succulent perennial with cone-shaped leaves along its hidden stem. It may be brown, reddish-purple, or greenish and bears a branching inflorescence with a few flowers per branch, each opening into a star-shaped bloom with five pointed petals. It sprouts after significant winter rains (December to February) and flowers from May to June. It produces a many-seeded fruit from a simple pistil, which disperses seeds along a single suture. It is only found on bare surface hardpans of Torrey sandstone with minimal topsoil. Small marble-sized, iron-bearing granules are present at all sites and are likely an edaphic requirement.

Total population estimates vary by year and by researcher. Extensive studies have been completed on Carmel Mountain, Carmel Valley, San Diego. The Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) of San Diego County estimated the Carmel Mountain population at just 1446 individuals in 2002, and at 113,134 individuals in 2006. Most recently, in 2008, UCLA faculty Dr. Hartmut S. Walter and Matthew Luskin estimated the Carmel Mountain population at over 100,000 individuals. Their population is highly dependent on rainfall, exploding in population when there is annual rainfall over 10 inches, and drastically shrinking when there is less than 4 inches of annual rainfall.

Conservation [edit]

Dudleya blochmaniae subsp. brevifolia is a high conservation priority because it exists only in these 5 locations (listed by decreasing average yearly population): Torrey Pines State Reserve, Carmel Mountain (on multiple sites), Crest Canyon, Skeletal Canyon, and Torrey Pines Extension. The total habitat outside of the Torrey Pines State Reserve that contains this species was estimated at just 2,667 square meters.

Dudleya blochmaniae subsp. brevifolia is listed as an endangered species in California (listed January 1982). On October 7, 1996, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service withdrew federal protection as an endangered species citing the threats to the species had diminished and that it was a "covered species" within the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) of southern San Diego County.

References [edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Treated at the subspecies level by USFWS (2/96) and by Kartesz (1999); has also been treated at the species level as D. brevifolia (e.g., by Kartesz, 1994).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!