Overview

Brief Summary

Krill or Euphausiid shrimp superficially resemble decapod shrimp, but they lack maxillipeds, and carry their thoracic gills outside the carapace, giving them a feathery appearance (Tudge, 2000). Most krill feed on phytoplankton and many are filter feeders. A few species are known to hunt copepods and other zooplankton (Saether, 1986)

They form an important link in the marine food chain. They occur in huge numbers throughout the global oceans and link the algae and zooplankton they feed on to the many larger predators including baleen whales (Tudge, 2000).

  • Saether, O., Trond Erling Ellingsen & Viggo Mohr (1986). "Lipids of North Atlantic krill" (PDF). Journal of Lipid Research 27 (3): 274–285
  • Tudge, C. The Variety of Life: A survey and celebration of all the creatures that have ever lived. Oxford University Press, 2000. Oxford, United Kingdom.
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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Euphausiacea (large sized Euphausiacea, Mysidacea, Hyperiidea, Ostracoda) is prey of:
Mysidacea
Ostracoda
Euphausiacea
Hyperiidea
Cyclopoida
Calanoida
Chaetognatha
Polychaeta

Based on studies in:
Pacific (Marine, Tropical)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • E. A. Shushkina and M. E. Vinogradov, Trophic relationships in communities and the functioning of marine ecosystems: II. Some results of investigations on the pelagic ecosystem in tropical regions of the ocean. In: Marine Production Mechanisms, M. J. Dun
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Known prey organisms

Euphausiacea (large sized Euphausiacea, Mysidacea, Hyperiidea, Ostracoda) preys on:
detritus
phytoplankton
bacteria
protozoa
Mysidacea
Ostracoda
Euphausiacea
Hyperiidea

Based on studies in:
Pacific (Marine, Tropical)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • E. A. Shushkina and M. E. Vinogradov, Trophic relationships in communities and the functioning of marine ecosystems: II. Some results of investigations on the pelagic ecosystem in tropical regions of the ocean. In: Marine Production Mechanisms, M. J. Dun
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:1345
Specimens with Sequences:1268
Specimens with Barcodes:1174
Species:59
Species With Barcodes:56
Public Records:1239
Public Species:53
Public BINs:61
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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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