Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Restricted to the zone of coastal influence in southern California and northern Baja California, Mexico.

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Leaves generally < 12 per rosette; peduncle > 4 cm; mainland (Hickman 1993).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Coastal sage scrub, chaparral, coastal bluff scrub and valley and foothill grassland below 450 meters and within the immediate influence of the coast. Seems to thrive in open, rocky slopes, often serpentine and ultramafic clay soils, though sand and loam are also known to support populations (Hickman 1993).

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Associations

Known Pests: RODENTIA

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: Fewer than 20 Element Occurrences in California and 5 in Baja California, Mexico.

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General Ecology

Rodents are known to eat these plants. Rabbits sometimes burrow after the corms. This taxon is drought tolerant, and seems to tolerate some disturbance, though decreased competition may be the true reason the plants seem to tolerate disturbance. Avena competes in clay soils.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL, Long-lived

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T2 - Imperiled

Reasons: Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. blochmaniae is known from fewer than twenty extant occurrences in southern California and fewer than five extant occurrences in Baja California, Mexico. Development seriously threatens this taxon.

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: Development in southern California is destroying the habitat for this species.

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Threats

Comments: Development is threatening this species.

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Management

Restoration Potential: The potential for restoration of this species is very good if suitable habitat can be protected. Plants will grow from cuttings and often flower in their first year. Wild populations could easily be augmented with this practice.

Preserve Selection and Design Considerations: Plants need open, rocky slopes within the zone of coastal influence and serpentine or clay soils. Sites for preserves should have a viable mosaic of coastal scrub, chaparral, coastal bluff scrub and grassland with open, rocky patches. Both northern and southern populations should be preserved as they are genetically distinct.

Management Requirements: Plants are hardy and will tolerate some disturbance. Trampling and land conversion are the main things to avoid. Keep propagules from northern and southern populations separate; they are genetically distinct.

Management Programs: Some southern California populations are being managed (e.g., Camp Pendleton), but most populations are left unprotected.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Risks

Stewardship Overview: Some of the southern California populations are being managed. Most populations are unprotected and threatened by development.

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