Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This little-known species is endemic to northeastern Madagascar. The species has been recorded in the Masoala Peninsula, Zahamena National Park, and Betampona Strict Nature Reserve. There are only four confirmed recent localities, including two individuals with aberrant coloration in reed beds of Lac Alaotra at around 800 m (J. Durbin pers. comm.). There were also historical records from the area surrounding Lac Alaotra. The known records in rainforest range in elevation from 200 to 650 m. The type locality is unknown. There are historical records from Mananara MAB Reserve (Albignac 1973). Despite substantial trapping efforts in eastern rainforest over the last 15 years above 600 m, the species has not been recorded in any new sites (S.M. Goodman pers. comm.).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a diurnal species that has been recorded from lowland tropical humid forest, and possibly from the reedbeds surrounding Lac Alaotra (J. Durbin pers. comm.). The animals rest in burrows or hollow trees during the night. Usually found singly or in pairs.The gestation period is about three months and there is a single young (Albignac 1973). This species is shy and sensitive to human disturbance.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
B1ab(ii,iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Hawkins, A.F.A., Durbin, J. & Dollar, L.

Reviewer/s
Hoffmann, M. (Global Mammal Assessment Team) & Duckworth, J.W. (Small Carnivore Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Although this species is not well known, the current extent of occurrence is estimated at less than 20,000 km², and the habitat within this range is fragmented and continues to decline as a result of ongoing threats. There is currently no evidence of hunting, persecution, or the effects of non-native carnivores, although there is a need to determine the extent of these threats, in light of which the species may require uplisting to Endangered.

History
  • 2000
    Vulnerable
  • 1996
    Vulnerable
  • 1994
    Insufficiently Known
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Insufficiently Known
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Insufficiently Known
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Insufficiently Known
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
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Population

Population
There is no information on the population status of this secretive species. The only locations where there have been recent multiple observations are Betampona Strict Nature Reserve (Britt and Virkaitis 2003) and Masoala National Park (F. Hawkins pers. comm.).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
It is threatened by deforestation of its habitat through conversion to cultivated land, selective logging and charcoal production. The lowland forest below 500 m is one of the most threatened habitats in Madagascar. There is no knowledge of hunting, persecution, or the effects of non-native carnivores, although it is certain that these occur within the species’ range.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species has been recorded from Masoala National Park, Zahamena National Park, and Betampona Strict Nature Reserve. Additional work is needed to determine the current status of the populations of this species across its range, as well as basic information on its ecology and natural history.
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Wikipedia

Brown-tailed mongoose

The brown-tailed mongoose, Malagasy brown-tailed mongoose, or salano (Salanoia concolor) is a species of mammal in the Eupleridae family. It is endemic to Madagascar. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Taxonomy[edit]

The brown-tailed mongoose was first described in 1837 by French zoologist Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire under the names Galidia unicolor and Galidia olivacea. He placed both in the genus Galidia, together with the ring-tailed mongoose (Galidia elegans),[2] which is now recognized as the only species of that genus.[3] However, the name unicolor had been a misprint for concolor, and the name was corrected in an erratum and in a later note by Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire.[4] In 1865,[Note 1] John Edward Gray placed concolor and olivacea in their own subgenus of Galidia, which he called Salanoia.[6] In 1882, St. George Jackson Mivart also separated olivacea and concolor from Galidia, and placed them in a separate genus Hemigalidia, without mentioning Salanoia.[7] In his 1904 Index generum mammalium, Palmer noted that Salanoia, the first name to be published, was the proper name for the genus.[8] Although Glover Morrill Allen, in 1939, still listed two species, which he called Salanoia olivacea and S. unicolor,[9] by 1972 R. Albignac recognized a single species only, which he called Salanoia concolor.[10] A second species of Salanoia, Salanoia durrelli, was described in 2010.[11]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The description appeared in the Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London for 1864, but the Proceedings often did not appear in the year they were for, and Salanoia was published in May 1865.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hawkins et al., 2008
  2. ^ Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1837, p. 581
  3. ^ Wozencraft, 2005, pp. 560–561
  4. ^ Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1839, p. 37
  5. ^ Allen, 1939, p. 227; Wozencraft, 2005, p. 561
  6. ^ Gray, 1865, p. 523; Allen, 1939, p. 226
  7. ^ Mivart, 1882, p. 188
  8. ^ Palmer, 1904, pp. 317, 617
  9. ^ Allen, 1939, p. 228
  10. ^ Albignac, 1972, p. 677
  11. ^ Durbin et al., 2010

Literature cited[edit]

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