Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Dry deciduous forests and scrub jungles, also in the plains. Native of Tropical America"
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Miscellaneous Details

Fruits edible.
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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"Maharashtra: Pune Karnataka: Hassan, Mysore Kerala: Alapuzha, Idukki, Thiruvananthapuram Tamil Nadu: All districts"
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Physical Description

Morphology

"
Field Tips

Areoles raised, densly elongate bristles. Spines 5-7 per areole.

Flower

Solitary, sessile, yellow. Flowering throughout the year.

Fruit

A berry, obovoid, purple when ripe. Seeds many. Fruiting from MArch onwards.

Habit

An armed shrub.

"
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Description

Shrubs sprawling or erect, 1-3 m tall. Trunk absent or short. Larger, terminal joints green to gray-green, obovate or elliptic-obovate to suborbicular, 10-35(-40) × 7.5-20(-25) cm. Areoles 2-9 mm in diam. Spines 1-12(-20) per areole on most areoles, spreading, yellow, ± brown banded or mottled, subulate, straight or curved, 1.2-4(-6) cm, basally flattened; glochids yellow. Leaves subulate, 4.5-6 mm, deciduous. Flowers 5-9 cm in diam. Sepaloids greenish with yellow margin, broadly deltoid-obovate to obovate, 10-25 × 6-12 mm, margin entire or slightly crisped, apex mucronate. Petaloids spreading, bright yellow, obovate or cuneate-obovate, 25-30 × 12-20 mm, margin entire or slightly undulate, apex rounded, truncate, or emarginate. Filaments yellow, ca. 12 mm; anthers yellow, ca. 1.5 mm. Style yellow or yellowish, 12-20 mm; stigmas 5, pale green, ca. 4.5 mm. Fruit purple, turbinate to obovoid, 4-6 × 2.5-3(-4) cm, fleshy at maturity, umbilicus deep. Seeds light tan, irregularly orbicular, 4-5 × 4-4.5 mm. Fl. Jun-Oct(-Dec).
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
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Synonym

Cactus dillenii Ker Gawler, Bot. Reg. 3: t. 255. 1818; Opuntia stricta (Haworth) Haworth var. dillenii (Ker Gawler) L. Benson.
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Ecology

Habitat

General Habitat

"Common in wastelands. Plains from the coast to 900m. Native to America. Introduced, now in the wild."
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Habitat & Distribution

Thickets, rocks, sandy soils, also cultivated as a hedge; near sea level. S Guangdong, S Guangxi, Hainan [native to the Caribbean region; widely introduced and naturalized in tropical regions].
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Associations

Cuban Cactus Scrub Flora Associations

Lying in the rainshadow of upwind mountains, the Cuban Cactus Scrub ecoregion is a semi-arid region of the Caribbean Basin supporting a thorny cactus scrub. The most characteristic and abundant flora species correspond to the xeromorphous coastal and subcoastal scrubland with abundant cacti succulents, also called coastal manigua. Cactus associate species to Opuntia dillenii include: O. triacantha, Harrisia eriophora, H. taetra, Pilosocereus robinii and Dendrocereus nudiflorus. Evergreen shrubs and small trees include: Bourreria virgata, Capparis cynophallophora, Eugenia buxifolia, Bursera glauca and B. cubana.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Opuntia dillenii

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Opuntia dillenii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T4 - Apparently Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Uses

"Fruits edible, helps to increase appetite. Excessive amounts may cause diaohrrea. Flowers are placed over heat boils on body for healing. Fruits eaten by peacocks, squirrels, hares. Roots eaten by boar."
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Notes

Comments

This species was first recorded in China in 1702.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Introduced into S India and Australia, where it is known as Pest Pear.

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