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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

General: Aster family (Asteraceae). New York aster is an upright, native perennial that grows between one and a half to five feet tall. The leaves are elliptic to linear, smooth to scabrous above and glabrous beneath (Radford, Ahles & Bell 1968). The disc flowers are red to yellow. The flowers are hermaphrodite (having both male and female organs) and are pollinated by bees, butterflies, flies, beetles and moths.

Distribution: New York aster ranges from Newfoundland and Nova Scotia south to Georgia, apparently to Alabama, chiefly near the coast (Tiner 1987). For current distribution, please consult the Plant profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Alternative names

Michaelmas daisy, Aster novi-belgii

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aster johannensis var. johannensis :
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aster foliaceus var. arcuans Fernald:
Canada (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aster johannensis Fernald:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aster crenifolius var. arcuans (Fernald) Cronquist:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aster novi-belgii L.:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)
El Salvador (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Adaptation

New York aster is found growing in slightly brackish and tidal fresh marshes, occasionally borders of salt marshes; inland marshes, shrub marshes, shores and other moist areas (Tiner 1987). This plant requires well-drained soil and prefers sandy, loamy and clay soils. It can grow on nutritionally poor soil, in semi-shade or no shade but prefers a sunny location.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Ecology

Dispersal

Establishment

Propagation by Seed: New York aster seeds should be sown fresh in the fall or spring (Heuser 1997). Pre-chill spring sown seeds to improve germination. When the seedlings are large enough to handle, place them into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division of this species should be done in the spring. Large divisions can be planted into their permanent positions whereas smaller clumps should be kept in a cold frame until they are growing well.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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© NatureServe

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

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Status

Please consult the Plants Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status, such as, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
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© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

Supplier: Name It's Source (profile not public)

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Cultivars, improved and selected materials (and area of origin)

Available through some native plant seed sources. Contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service) office for more information. Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.”

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Divisions of New York aster should be done in the spring every three years to maintain vigor (Heuser 1997). Regular spraying is recommended for this species because it is prone to mildew and attack from pests.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Uses

Landscape: New York aster is an excellent upright perennial for a mixed bed or border. This species provides a color accent, bringing autumn color to the garden.

Wildlife: New York aster is known for attracting butterflies and moths to areas where it is found growing. This is a good bee plant providing nectar in the autumn. Most species in this genus seem to be immune to the predictions of rabbits (Thomas 1990).

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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