Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: California: San Joaquin Valley (central Kern County). Other reports are no longer considered to be this taxon (cf. Munz 1974; Benson 1982; Brown and Cypher 1997).

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Historic Range:
U.S.A. (CA)

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Sandy soils or sand flats and low hills mostly in grassland at 120-550 m (Benson 1982; Brown and Cypher 1997). Characteristic in Sierra-Tehachapi Saltbush Scrub community, but also in Blue Oak Woodland and a riparian woodland.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Twenty-nine occurrences are presumed extant; about half have not been surveyed for over 20 years (USFWS 2011; CNDDB 2012).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: Historically, this taxon occurred in populations that were more or less continuous east of Bakersfield, California. It is now restricted to a limited area of central Kern County near the Southern San Joaquin Valley. About one-third of the historical occurrences have been extirpated due to the conversion of habitat into agriculture and urban development. The remaining populations are small and highly fragmented, concentrated into about 11 areas. Only four core areas contain populations of greater than 1,000 clumps. Remaining populations are threatened by loss of habitat from agricultural, urbanizing, mining and energy developments, off-road vehicle traffic, trash dumping, grazing, and competition with non-native invasive species.

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Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 07/19/1990
Lead Region:   California/Nevada Region (Region 8) 
Where Listed:


Population detail:

Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Opuntia basilaris treleasei, see its USFWS Species Profile

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 30-50%

Comments: Population numbers appear to be declining at the Sand Ridge Preserve, the only site that has been recently monitored (USFWS 2011).

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Very high

Comments: Primarily threatened by habitat loss due to urban and agricultural development. Specific threats from urban development include expansion of residential areas, roads, an airport, and a landfill. Additional threats include mining and energy development, off-road vehicle traffic, trash dumping, grazing, competition with non-native invasive species, and climate change.

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Management

Biological Research Needs: Investigate the reproductive biology of the taxon and identify its primary pollinators.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: USFWS treats as Opuntia treleasei (8/93).

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Disclaimer

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