Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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B.C., N.W.T., Yukon; Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Idaho, Mont., Nev., N.Mex., Oreg., Utah, Wash., Wyo.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Rhizomes 3-8 cm diam. Leaves mostly floating, occasionally emersed or submersed; petiole terete. Leaf blade abaxially and adaxially green, widely ovate, 10-40(-45) × 7-30 cm, ca. 1.2-1.5 times as long as wide, sinus 1/3-2/3 length of midrib, lobes divergent to overlapping; surfaces glabrous. Flowers 5-10 cm diam.; sepals mostly (6-)9(-12), abaxially green to adaxially yellow, sometimes red-tinged toward base; petals oblong, thick; anthers 3.5-9 mm, slightly shorter than filaments. Fruit green to yellow, cylindric to ovoid, 4-6(-9) × 3.5-6 cm, strongly ribbed, slightly constricted below stigmatic disk; stigmatic disk green, 20-35 mm diam., entire to crenate; stigmatic rays 8-26(-36), linear to lanceolate, terminating within 1(-1.5) mm from margin of disk. Seeds 3.5-5 mm. 2 n = 34.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Nuphar lutea (Linnaeus) Smith subsp. polysepala (Endelmann) E. O. Beal; Nymphaea polysepala (Engelmann) Greene
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Ecology

Habitat

Ponds, lakes, and sluggish streams; 0-3700m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering spring (later in north)-summer.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Nuphar polysepala

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Nuphar polysepala

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Nuphar polysepala

Nuphar polysepala (the yellow pond-lily; syn. Nuphar polysepalum orth. err., Nuphar lutea subsp. polysepala (Engelm.) E.O.Beal) is a species of Nuphar native to western North America.[1][2] The name Nuphar is Greek for "water-lily" and polysepala means many sepals. It is commonly found in shallow muddy ponds from northern Alaska and Yukon southward to central California and northern New Mexico, and can be recognized easily by its large floating leaves and bright yellow blossoms.

Habitat and ecology[edit]

It reproduces by both seed and rhizome. The rhizomes are underground stems that are thick and fleshy. These rhizomes are hard to pry since they are submerged in mud and are difficult to dig. The leaves float on the water surface, and have an external waxy coating which makes the leaf waterproof and thus allows the leaf stomata to breathe freely; they are glossy green, oval, 10–45 cm long and 7–30 cm wide, with a notch at one side to the leaf stem. The leaves provide shelter for fish. The rhizomes (underground stems) are round and submerged in mud.[1][2]

Flowers and fruit[edit]

The flowers are 5–10 cm diameter, and have 6 to 12 (most often 9) bright yellow petal-like sepals; the true petals are small, hidden near the stamens. Inside the flower from top view anthers can be seen as red and true petals are wedge-shaped and are hidden by the stamens. The fruit is a ovoid green to yellowish capsule 4–6 cm (rarely 9 cm) long 3.5–6 cm wide.[1][2]

Uses[edit]

Food[edit]

The seeds are edible; they pop like popcorn, and can be steamed as a vegetable, dried and ground for flour, or can be cooked like oatmeal.[2]

Medicinal[edit]

Leaves and rootstocks have been used for ulcerous skin conditions and swelling. The rootstock infusion is used as a traditional gargle for mouth, sore throats and douche for vaginal inflammation. The rootstock is prepared from two tablespoon chopped rhizome with one cup boiling water .[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Flora of North America: Nuphar polysepala
  2. ^ a b c d e Schofield, J.J. (1989). Marshes, Ponds, and Wet Places in Alaska, Western Canada, and the Northwest= pages=53-55. 
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Notes

Comments

Plants intermediate between Nuphar polysepala and N . variegata occur in eastern British Columbia.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Treated by Kartesz (1994 checklist) as a subspecies of Nuphar lutea; sometimes treated as a distinct species, N. polysepala (e.g., FNA, 1997).

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