Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Lontra canadensis kodiacensis
Catalog Number: USNM 98142
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Mammals
Sex/Stage: Female;
Preparation: Skull
Collector(s): G. Grinnell
Year Collected: 1899
Locality: Kodiak Island, Uyak Bay, Alaska, United States, North America
  • Type:
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Insular mammal, endemic to Alaska. Population abundance and trend unknown, but suspected stable. Few threats. Habitat is mostly pristine with the majority protected within Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Although subspecific distinction was disputed by Rausch (1969), L. c. kodiacensis was accepted by van Zyll de Jong (1972) and was listed as one of seven subspecies of northern river otters in North America by Hall (1981). This subspecies is distinguished by its slightly smaller size than most other subspecies and characteristics of its skull shape and dentition (Fagen 1986).

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