Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Schrankia nuttallii (DC.) Standl.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Leptoglottis nuttallii DC.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Perennial, Shrubs, Herbs, Stems woody below, or from woody crown or caudex, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems prostrate, trailing, or mat forming, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems 1-2 m tall, Stems greater than 2 m tall, Trunk or stems armed with thorns, spines or prickles, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Stems with hooked uncinate hairs or prickles, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules setiform, subulate or acicular, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Leaves compound, Leaves bipinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets opposite, Leaflets 10-many, Leaves glabrous or nearly so, Flowers solitary in axils, or appearing solitary, Inflorescences globose heads, capi tate or subcapitate, Inflorescence axillary, Flowers actinomorphic or somewhat irregular, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx glabrous, Petals united, valvate, Petals white, Imperfect flowers present, dioecious or polygamodioecious, Stamens 9-10, Stamens completely free, separate, Stamens long exserted, Filaments glabrous, Filaments pink or red, Style terete, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit strongly curved, falcate, bent, or lunate, Fruit exserted from calyx, Fruit spiny, bur-like, with hooked bristles or prickles, Fruit beaked, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seed with elliptical line or depression, pleurogram, Seeds subquadrate, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Isotype for Leptoglottis mimosoides Small
Catalog Number: US 1289518
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Ruth
Locality: Fort Worth., Tarrant, Texas, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Small, J. K. 1928. N. Amer. Fl. 23: 139.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Sensitive Brier in Illinois

Schrankia nuttallii (Sensitive Brier)
(Also referred to as Mimosa quadrivalvis & Schrankia uncinata; bees collect pollen or explore the flowers, while the bee fly and beetle feed on pollen or explore the flowers; the flowers lack nectar; most observations are from Bernhardt, otherwise observations are from Mitchell, Moure & Hurd, LaBerge, and MacRae)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera cp (Bht); Apidae (Bombini): Bombus griseocallis cp fq (Bht), Bombus nevadensis cp (Bht), Bombus pensylvanica cp fq (Bht); Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes agilis cp (Mch), Svastra obliqua obliqua cp (LB); Anthophoridae (Xylocopini): Xylocopa virginica cp (Bht); Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile addenda cp (Bht), Megachile brevis brevis cp (Bht), Megachile montivaga cp (Bht); Megachilidae (Osmiini): Hoplitis pilosifrons cp (Bht)

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Augochlorella persimilis cp fq (Bht), Augochlorella striata cp fq (MH, Bht), Augochloropsis sumptuosa cp fq (MH, Bht), Augochloropsis sumptuosa cp fq (Bht), Halictus ligatus cp (Bht), Halictus parallelus cp (Bht), Lasioglossum sp. cp (Bht), Lasioglossum albipennis cp (Bht), Lasioglossum bruneri cp (MH), Lasioglossum illinoensis cp (Bht), Lasioglossum nymphaearum exp (Bht), Lasioglossum versatus cp fq (Bht); Colletidae (Colletinae): Colletes kincaidii cp fq (Bht); Colletidae (Hylaeinae): Hylaeus sp. cp (Bht)

Flies
Bombyliidae: Unidentified sp. fp/exp (Bht)

Beetles
Buprestidae: Acmaeodera tubulus fp/exp (McR)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Mimosa nuttallii

Mimosa nuttallii, the Catclaw Brier or Sensitive Brier, is a herbaceous perennial legume in the subfamily Mimosoideae native to the central United States. It has a trailing semiwoody vine covered with small recurved prickles that can be painful to bare skin.

The ribbed stems of this plant usually grow to 4 ft. or more and are branched. Plants rarely reach more than 1-2 ft. in height. The frond-like leaves are alternate with prickly stalks. The bipinnate leaf blades are divided into 4-9 pairs of small segments, and these are again divided into 8-15 pairs of tiny leaflets. Leaflets are elliptic, glabrous, with a prominent midrib. Like a few other species of Mimosa (such as M. pudica), the leaves fold up when touched or disturbed. It is also said that the roots of M.nuttallii give off an acrid, garlic like smell when disturbed. This may be an additional defense mechanism of the plant.

Seed pods

The tiny flowers occur in congested bunches. Before they open, they look much like small green bramble fruits. Each individual flower has five minute petals and 8-10 conspicuous stamens. When open, the pink-purple stamens form a globelike cluster at the tip of their leafless stalk. Yellow spores can be often be seen highlighting the tips. The globes are about 0.5 to 0.75" across (about 1.3-2 cm). Flowers and fruits appear from May to September.

The fruit of the Catclaw Brier is a long, slender, rounded pod that has a covering of dense prickles, typically about 3-7 cm (1.2-2.8 in) long.

Habitat includes disturbed areas of sandy or silty soils, roadsides, grasslands, prairies and forest margins. It is known to be very nutritious for livestock, who will seek it out. On rangeland, its absence can also be a good indicator of overgrazing.

Other common names for this plant include Nuttall's sensitive briar and Shame-boy, a reference to the sensitive foliage that closes upon touch. Former synonyms include Schrankia nuttallii. The species name nuttallii is in honor of Thomas Nuttall, an English botanist who lived in the United States for many years.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Genus Shrankia was changed to Mimosa (Kartesz checklist 1994) (Martinez, TNC-HO, 6/94).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!