Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species was endemic to Australia, where it was generally restricted to south-eastern South Australia. The last wild individuals were recorded in 1924, although a few captives survived until around 1937. Surveys conducted by the South Australia National Parks and Wildlife Service suggest that the species persisted until the early 1970's (Smith and Robinson 2008).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species was found in areas of open country. It lived at the edge of Stringy-bark heath in grassy areas too wet in winter to support eucalypt cover (Smith and Robinson 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EX
Extinct

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Australasian Mammal Assessment Workshop

Reviewer/s
Lamoreux, J. & Hilton-Taylor, C. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Extinct because the last wild individuals of Macropus greyi were recorded in 1924, although a few captives survived until around 1937. This species has not be recorded since, despite extensive research in the region.

History
  • 1996
    Extinct
  • 1994
    Extinct
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Extinct
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Extinct
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Extinct
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
  • 1982
    Extinct
    (Thornback and Jenkins 1982)
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Population

Population
It is presumed to be extinct.
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Threats

Major Threats
Introduced predators, competition from livestock, bounty and sport hunting, and direct killing for the animal's pelt have resulted in the extinction of the species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Any reports of the persistence of this species, including finds of recent remains, should be investigated to determine whether it is possibly still extant.
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Wikipedia

Toolache wallaby

The Toolache wallaby or Grey's wallaby[3] (Macropus greyi) is an extinct species of wallaby from south-eastern South Australia and South-western Victoria. Many people consider it to have been the most elegant, graceful and swift species of kangaroo. It had fine fur with alternating bands of darker and lighter grey across the back. The bands differed in their colour and texture. The marking may have varied seasonally or between individuals. Its hopping consisted on two short hops, then a long one followed by a stare into the sky.

Illustration of the upper body by John Gould

The wallaby was gregarious, with groups being loyal to a particular location. Greyhounds were used to chase the wallabies, which never hurried until the dogs got close and then bounded away. One individual was chased on horseback for six kilometres and escaped through a fence. The wallaby was hunted for fur and sport and was affected by pastoralism. It was relatively common until 1910, but was very rare in 1923, with the last known group of 14 inhabiting the Konetta sheep run near Robe. Professor Wood Jones and others failed in attempts to capture wallabies and transfer them to a sanctuary on Kangaroo Island. Four individuals were captured, all dead or dying by being driven too hard; they died from exhaustion and shock. Local hunters harassed wallabies to obtain pelts or trophies. A female, with a young in her pouch, was captured and survived for 12 years in captivity at Robe until 1939. One wallaby may have been captured in 1943. The wallaby became extinct because of hunting, foxes and land loss.

References

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ Australasian Mammal Assessment Workshop (2008). Macropus greyi. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 28 December 2008. Database entry includes justification for why this species is listed as extinct
  3. ^ Green, Tamara (2001). Extinctosaurus: Encyclopedia of Lost and Endangered Species. Brimax. p. 148. 
  • Flannery, T and P Schouten, "A Gap in Nature," Atlantic Monthly Press, 2001, pg. 152. ISBN 0-87113-797-6
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