Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Gnaphosa snohomish

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: This large ground-dwelling hunting spider is a bog specialist endemic to the Puget Sound and Georgia Basin area of British Columbia, Canada and adjacent Washington, United States. It was previously known from a single pair of specimens from central Washington but then discovered in 1998 in cranberry bogs on the lower mainland of British Columbia. It is now also known from Vancouver Island and some Gulf Islands. At a 2010 Canadian arachnid workshop, this species was noted as globally rare because of its habitat specialization and geographic restriction.

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