Overview

Brief Summary

Dolomedes tenebrosus, the dark fishing spider, is a spider in the family Pisauridae.  It inhabits wetlands and moist forests in northeastern North America (Carico 1973).  This is one of the largest spiders in the region.  Females are larger than males.  They are 15-40 mm in length and their slender legs can be up to 100 mm long (Gaddy 2009).  Individuals can often be found on tree trunks or logs near ponds and streams. Like other fishing spiders they may venture out on the water surface to catch insects, and there are even reports that they occasionally prey on small fish (Barbour 1921).  But this species is not restricted to aquatic habitats. It also occurs in hardwood forests quite a distance away from any body of water (Carico 1973, Gaddy 2009). While these spiders can often be seen at any time of the day, they are most active at night.  The best places to find them during the day are tree cavities and crevices in stumps and logs (Gaddy 2009).

  • Barbour, T. 1921. Spiders feeding on small cyprinodonts. Psyche 28 (4):131–132. doi:10.1155/1921/19421
  • Carico, J.E. 1973. The Nearctic species of the genus Dolomedes (Araneae: Pisauridae). Bulletin of The Museum of Comparative Zoology 144:435–488.
  • Gaddy, L. L. 2009. Spiders of the Carolinas. Kollath & Stensaas Publishers, Duluth, MN.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Katja Schulz

Supplier: Katja Schulz

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

The habitat of this species seems to be more variable than that of other members of the genus. Collection notes and personal observations show it to be commonly encountered in the environs of the swamps and ponds in the southern United States coastal plain and the lakes and ponds of the glaciated part of the range. Although little microhabitat data accompanied the northern collections, a large number of collections gave the name of a lake as part of the locality data. In the southern coastal plain I have collected D. tenebrosus primarily from the vertical trunks of trees and other objects emerging from slow-moving streams and ponds, a habitat that is shared with D. okefinokensis. Unlike other Dolomedes, this species was regularly collected a considerable distance from water. Data with specimens collected in Indiana and Pennsylvania state that they were found "on trunk of dead tree in beech maple forest" and on "dead trees in deep woods," respectively. In the mountainous regions of Virginia and North Carolina, I have never taken a mature specimen of D. tenebrosus near bodies of water (where I have done considerable collecting), but have encountered it infrequently in woods under logs and more often in association with houses. Although I have collected males and females in basements, most such specimens have been brought to me by excited homeowners who have also found them in basements, kitchens, and, in one case, the bedroom. Comments by Bishop (1924), Kaston (1948), and Gertsch (personal communication) confirm that the relative freedom from the aquatic habitat is a distinct feature of the natural history of this species.

  • Bishop, S. C. 1924. A revision of the Pisauridae of the United States. Bull. New York State Mus., 252: 1-140.
  • Kaston, B. J. 1936. The senses involved in the courtship of some vagabond spiders. Entomol. American. 16: 97—167.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Harvard University. Museum of Comparative Zoology

Supplier: Katja Schulz

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Dolomedes tenebrosus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 6 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACTTTATATTTTATATTTGGTGTATGGTCTGCTATAGTTGGAACAGCTATA---AGAGTATTAATTCGAATGGAGTTAGGTAATTCTGGTAGACTTTTAGGTGAT---GATCATTTGTATAATGTTATAGTAACTGCTCATGCTTTTGTTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTAATGCCTATTTTAATTGGTGGTTTTGGTAATTGATTAGTACCTTTAATA---TTAGGTGCTCCTGATATATCATTTCCTCGAATAAATAATTTATCTTTTTGATTATTACCTCCTTCTTTGTTTTTATTGTTTATATCATCTATAGTAGAAATAGGAGTGGGGGCAGGGTGAACCGTATATCCTCCTTTAGCTTCTAGAGTTGGACATATAGGAAGATCTATAGATTTT---GCTATTTTTTCTTTACATTTAGCAGGAGCTTCTTCTATTATAGGAGCAGTTAATTTTATTTCTACAATTATTAATATACGTTTAGTAGGAATAACTATAGAAAGGGTTCCTTTATTTGTATGGTCAGTTTTTATTACTGCTATTTTATTATTATTATCTTTACCTGTATTAGCAGGG---GCTATTACTATATTATTAACAGATCGAAATTTTAATACTTCTTTTTTTGATCCGGCAGGAGGTGGTGATCCTATTTTATTTCAACATTTATTTTGATTTTTTGGTCATCCAGAGGTTTATATTTTAATTTTACCAGGGTTTGGAATTGTATCCCATGTAATTAGTTCTTCTGTTGGTAAACGA---GAACCTTTTGGGAGTTTAGGAATGATTTATGCTATAGTGGGGATTGGTGGTATAGGATTTGTTGTTTGGGCTCATCATATATTTTCTGTTGGAATAGATGTTGATACTCGTGCTTATTTTACTGCTGCTACTATAATTATTGCTGTGCCTACAGGTATTAAGGTTTTTAGTTGAATA---GCTACTCTTCATGGTTCT---TATTTTAAAATGAGAACTTCATTAATATGAAGAGTAGGGTTTGTATTTTTATTTACTTTAGGGGGAATTACTGGAGTAGTTTTATCTAATTCATCTTTAGATGTAGTTTTACATGACACTTATTATGTAGTAGCTCATTTTCACTATGTG---TTAAGAATAGGAGCTGTGTTTGCTATTTTAGCTGGAATAACTTATTGATTTCCTTTGTTTTTTGGTGTTGCTTTGAGAGAAAAAATAACTAAACTTAATTTTTATTTAATATTTATCGGTGTTAATATAACTTTTTTTCCTCAACATTTTTTAGGATTAAATGGAATA
-- end --

Download FASTA File

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dolomedes tenebrosus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 20
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Dolomedes tenebrosus

The Dark Fishing Spider[1] (Dolomedes tenebrosus) is a fishing spider found in northeastern North America.

Female bodies are 15–26 mm; males are 7–13 mm. Legs range from 50–90 mm. The spider is a pale to dark brown colour with several chevron markers and lighter stripes around its legs. It is similar to D. scriptus.[1]

Further reading[edit]

  • Bishop, S. C. 1924. A revision of the Pisauridae of the United States. New York St. Mus. Bull. 252: 1-140.
  • Carico, J. E. 1973. The Nearctic species of the genus Dolomedes (Araneae: Pisauridae). Bull. Mus. comp. Zool. Harv. 144: 435-488.
  • Carico, J. E. & P. C. Holt. 1964. A comparative study of the female copulatory apparatus of certain species in the spider genus Dolomedes (Pisauridae: Araneae). Tech. Bull. agric. Exp. Stat. Blacksburg Virg. 172: 1-27.
  • Comstock, J. H. 1940. The spider book, revised and edited by W. J. Gertsch. Cornell Univ. Press, Ithaca, xi + 727 pp.
  • Comstock, J. H. 1912. The spider book; a manual for the study of the spiders and their near relatives, the scorpions, pseudoscorpions, whipscorpions, harvestmen and other members of the class Arachnida, found in America north of Mexico, with analytical keys for their classification and popular accounts of their habits. Garden City, New York, pp. 1–721
  • Dondale, C. D. & J. H. Redner. 1990. The insects and arachnids of Canada, Part 17. The wolf spiders, nurseryweb spiders, and lynx spiders of Canada and Alaska, Araneae: Lycosidae, Pisauridae, and Oxyopidae. Research Branch, Agriculture Canada, Publ. 1856: 1-383.
  • Emerton, J. H. 1909. Supplement to the New England Spiders. Trans. Connect. Acad. Arts Sci. 14: 171-236.
  • Hentz, N. M. 1844. Descriptions and figures of the araneides of the United States. Boston J. nat. Hist. 4: 386-396.
  • Kaston, B. J. 1948. Spiders of Connecticut. Bull. Conn. St. geol. nat. Hist. Surv. 70: 1-874.
  • Montgomery, T. H. 1902. Descriptions of Lycosidae and Oxyopidae of Philadelphia and its vicinity. Proc. Acad. nat. Sci. Philad. 54: 534-592.
  • Paquin, P. & N. Dupérré. 2003. Guide d'identification des araignées de Québec. Fabreries, Suppl. 11 1-251.
  • Sierwald, P. 1990. Morphology and homologous features in the male palpal organ in Pisauridae and other spider families, with notes on the taxonomy of Pisauridae (Arachnida: Araneae). Nemouria (Occas. Pap. Delaware Mus. nat. Hist.) 35: 1-59.
  • Sierwald, P. 1989. Morphology and ontogeny of female copulatory organs in American Pisauridae, with special reference to homologous features (Arachnida: Araneae). Smithson. Contrib. Zool. 484: 1-24.
  • Sierwald, P. & J. A. Coddington. 1988. Functional aspects of the male palpal organ in Dolomedes tenebrosus, with notes on the mating behavior (Araneae, Pisauridae). J. Arachnol. 16: 262-265.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Weber, Larry. (2003) Spiders of the North Woods. Duluth, MN:Kollath+Stensaas, 104-105.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!