Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found widely distributed from Dahanee in the north (Western Ghats) and Cochin in the south at an altitude of less than 1,000 m. The extent of occurrence encompassing known and inferred distribution is more than 50,000 km², while the area of occupancy is also likely to be more than 2,000 km². In Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Kerala.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
There is some information on breeding biology from captivity. Males mature between 12 and 18 months and die after the first breeding season or within 24 months (S. Molur, B.A. Daniel & M. Siliwal pers. obs.). Gabriel (2005) reports male maturity after 354 days and survival for up to 344 days after maturity. The Western Ghats males mature faster (12 months) than the Eastern Ghats males (about 18 months) in captivity (S. Molur, B.A. Daniel & M. Siliwal pers. obs.). However, in the wild the maturity time would probably prolong due to environmental conditions and prey availability. Females mature between 5-7 years and live up to 10-12 years and produce on an average two clutches per year of 35-70 hatchlings per clutch in the wild.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Poecilotheria regalis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Poecilotheria regalis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 10
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Molur, S., Daniel, B.A. & Siliwal, M.

Reviewer/s
Spector, S. & Mason, T. (Terrestrial Invertebrates Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
The species is widely distributed in India, throughout northern Western Ghats and a few places in the Eastern Ghats. The range and area of occupancy is vast, and although the threats to the habitat and population are noticeable, the species does not come close to being threatened, hence it is classified as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
Population information is not available. This species is the most common of all Poecilotheria species and is encountered frequently in different habitats. Its population is healthy in natural vegetation; some individuals have been observed in teak plantations and in some degraded areas. However, the individuals seen in degraded habitats are usually males that are migrating in search of females, hence this cannot be taken as a compatible habitat for this species. The populations are severely fragmented although the species has been found in more than 20 locations.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Habitat loss and degradation are major threats, and collections for pet trade and persecution are additional threats to the species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is reported from Nagarjuna-Srisailam Tiger Reserve and Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary.
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Wikipedia

Poecilotheria regalis

Poecilotheria regalis is a species of arboreal tarantulas from the Western and Eastern Ghats, India.[1] The common name for this spider is Indian Ornamental Tree Spider, or simply Indian Ornamental. It is one of the most popular arboreal tarantulas for amateur collectors. Their legspan sometimes exceeds 7 inches (18 cm).

Name[edit]

The name Poecilotheria is derived from Greek "poikilos" - spotted and "therion" - wild beast. Regalis refers to "royal". This whole genus of arboreal tarantulas exhibits an intricate fractal-like pattern on the abdomen. The spider's natural habitat is primarily Southeastern India.

Behavior[edit]

The P. regalis' behavior parallels that of many arboreal spiders. In the wild the P. regalis live in holes of tall trees where they make asymmetric funnel webs. Their primary prey consists of various flying insects, which they seize in flight and paralyze. It is not unknown for the spiders of this genus to live communally when territory, i.e. number of holes per tree, is limited. They tend to be quite defensive spiders.

Bites[edit]

Although there has never been a recorded death from any tarantula bite this species is considered to have a medically significant bite, with venom that may cause intense pain, judging from the experience of keepers bitten by other spiders from this genus.[2][3][4][5] They move rapidly and, although they generally prefer flight to fight, may attack when cornered.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Molur, S., Daniel, B.A. & Siliwal, M. (2008). "Poecilotheria regalis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 6 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Gabriel,, R. (2002). "Notes and Observations Regarding the Bite of Poecilotheria pederseni". British Tarantula Society Journal 17 (2): 61–64. 
  3. ^ Poecilotheria regalis - Arachnoboards
  4. ^ Phong's Tarantulas! - Tarantula bites
  5. ^ Schmidt, G. (1988): Wie gefährlich sind Vogelspinnenbisse ? Deutsches Ärzteblatt 85 Heft 28/29(2): 1424-1425. (u. a. Infos about Poecilotheria fasciata)
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