Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Heteroscodra maculata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Heteroscodra maculata

Heteroscodra maculata is an Old World species of tarantula which was first described in 1899 by Reginald Innes Pocock. This species native to West Africa and is found primarily in Togo and Ghana. This species has many common names, of which Togo starburst and ornamental baboon are most frequently encountered.

Description[edit]

These tarantulas can reach their full size after about 3 years. When fully grown, these species can reach leg-spans of up to 5 inches. These spiders are characterized by their chalky white coloration with mottled black and brown markings. Notably, these tarantulas have very thick rear legs, leading many to believe that they are baboon spiders, however, they are not in the baboon spider subfamily of Harpactirinae.

Behavior[edit]

Heteroscodra maculata specimens are quite fast, defensive and possess potent venom. As these are old-world species, they do not possess urticating hairs, which further encourages them to bite as a primary defense. They are an arboreal species, though younger specimens have been noted to burrow during their first few months of life. Females tend to reproduce readily, though sexual cannibalism may occur. Egg sacs are reported to contain between 75 and 130 spiderlings.

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