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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in high elevations in the Cordilleras Central and Talamanca of Costa Rica to the Volcán Chiriquí region in west Panamá (Musser and Carleton 2005). It occurs from 2,100 to 3,400 m (Reid 1997).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs in wet montane forest, forest edge, dense grass, and paramo.

This species favors cold environments (Reid 1997). It is terrestrial, traveling in runways under logs and among rocks or through dense vegetation. Almost entirely insectivorous in diet, it prefers larval beetles, which are probably located by smell. Little nest-building activity occurs in captivity, and nests have not been found in the wild. It appears to breed year-round; litters size is 2 to 4 young, averaging 2.7 (Reid 1997).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Scotinomys xerampelinus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 13
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Samudio, R., Timm, R., Pino, J., Woodman, N. & Reid, F.

Reviewer/s
McKnight, M. (Global Mammal Assessment Team) & Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Although its extent of occurrence is probably less than 10,000 km2, this species is listed as Least Concern in view of its presumed large and stable population, occurrence in a number of protected areas, and because it does not appear to be under threat and is unlikely to be declining at nearly the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category.
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Population

Population
It is fairly common (Reid 1997).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species, though in parts of its range it is adversely affected by agrochemicals, loss of grassland habitat (to development) and to some extent, deforestation.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Much of its habitat occurs within protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Chiriqui brown mouse

The Chiriqui brown mouse (Scotinomys xerampelinus), also known as the long-tailed singing mouse, is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae.[2] It is found in cloud forest and paramo at elevations of 2100 to 3400 m in Costa Rica and Panama.[1]

Male Chiriqui brown mice sing to attract mates and to warn off other males from their territories. Their songs also serve to repel members of the related, smaller, competing species, S. teguina.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Samudio, R., Timm, R., Pino, J., Woodman, N. & Reid, F. (2008). "Scotinomys xerampelinus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 2013-10-08. 
  2. ^ Musser, G. G.; Carleton, M. D. (2005). "Superfamily Muroidea". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 1086. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  3. ^ Arnold, C. (2013-10-04). "Musical Mice Sing to Fend Off Rivals". National Geographic. Retrieved 2013-10-08. 
  4. ^ Pasch, B.; Bolker, B. M.; Phelps, S. M. (2013-09-09). "Interspecific Dominance Via Vocal Interactions Mediates Altitudinal Zonation in Neotropical Singing Mice". The American Naturalist (The American Society of Naturalists). JSTOR 10.1086/673263. 


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