Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known form intermediate elevations in western Panam (Chiriqu region) and on the Azuero Peninsula (Musser and Carleton 2005). It is known from 1,000 to 1,500 m (Carleton 1989).

The species is known from two disjunct populations, which are being looked at taxonomically (Timm pers. comm.).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in mature forest. Its biology is poorly known; it is nocturnal and terrestrial (Reid 1997).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Reid, F., Woodman, N., Timm, R. Samudio, R. & Pino, J.

Reviewer/s
McKnight, M. (Global Mammal Assessment Team) & Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Near Threatened because although its extent of occurrence is less than 20,000 km2, it occurs in several protected areas and the extent and quality of its habitat may be declining only in parts of its range. This species is restricted to mature forest and it appears to no longer occur in one previously known location. This makes it close to qualifying for Vulnerable under the B1 criterion if the decline in known locations continues and if the distribution becomes severely fragmented or restricted to less than 6 locations.

History
  • 1996
    Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
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Population

Population
It is apparently rare and local (Reid 1997). It may no longer occur in the Azuero Peninsula, where it has been looked for recently without success (Reid pers. comm.).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species. In many parts of its range, however, this species may be subject to threats from deforestation, roads, and agriculture.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It found within several protected areas including La Amistad National Park. More information is needed about this species' taxonomy, natural history, populations, and conservation status.
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Wikipedia

Yellow isthmus rat

The yellow isthmus rat (Isthmomys flavidus) is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found only in Panama. It was discovered by W. W. Brown, Jr. on the southern slope of Volcan de Chiriqui (8° 49' N, 82° 32' W). He found it common in the upland forest from 1000 to 1500m, but no specimens were taken above or below these elevations (Bangs 1902; Goldman 1920; Goodwin 1946). Museum records specify two isolated populations in western Panama, one at Cerro Colorado where R. Pine et al. collected in 1980 (8° 31' 60N, 81° 49' 0W) and at Cerro Hoya on the Azuero Peninsula by C. Handley in 1962 (7° 23' N, 80° 38' W). The presence of I. flavidus or a closely allied form in Costa Rica is probable (Goodwin 1946), however, no specimens have been reported. There are no currently known fossil records of Isthmomys (McKenna and Bell 1997).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reid, F., Woodman, N., Timm, R. Samudio, R. & Pino, J. (2008). Isthmomys flavidus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 18 Jule 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of near threatened.
  • Musser, G. G. and M. D. Carleton. 2005. Superfamily Muroidea. pp. 894–1531 in Mammal Species of the World a Taxonomic and Geographic Reference. D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder eds. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.


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