Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found on isolated mountains in Central and Western Kopet-Dag Mountains in SW Turkmenistan, mountains in Iran in the northeast (Khorassan Province, 5 km N Kashmar, USNM) and south (Kuh-e Laleh-Zar and Kuh-e Hazar Mtns south of Kerman), and the Hindu Kush of northern Afghanistan (Parvan Province, Shibar Pass, FMNH). Records in Afghanistan are possibly Microtus ilaeus.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Dry montane steppe habitats. In Turkmenia found along river valleys, at moist areas with trees and shrubs (poplar, willow, elm, and dewberry). Elevation ranges from 300 to 2000 m. Feed on green parts of different plants. Colonial, family area is 3-5 m square with 2-5 exits (Malygin, 1983). Pregnant females were found starting from April. It is possible that there is summer break in reproduction. Overwintered females give 2-3 litters per year. Average number of embryos is 6 (Marinina, 1981).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Microtus transcaspicus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Shenbrot, G.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Tsytsulina, K. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Although the species' range is small, there is no reason to suspect that the species is declining. The habitat for this species is not known to be under threat, hence it is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
No data available.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species. Range reductions could occur due to further climate aridification.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Found in many protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Transcaspian vole

The Transcaspian vole (Microtus transcaspicus) is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found in Afghanistan, Iran, and Turkmenistan.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shenbrot, G. (2008). Microtus transcaspicus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 27 June 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of least concern.
  • Musser, G. G. and M. D. Carleton. 2005. Superfamily Muroidea. pp. 894–1531 in Mammal Species of the World a Taxonomic and Geographic Reference. D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder eds. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.
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