Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from coastal and eastern South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland, and the eastern highlands of Zimbabwe and into neighbouring areas of Mozambique. It is known from above 900 m asl.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is known from grassland and marshes, as well as timber plantations.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Observations: One captive animal lived for 1.8 years and animals in the wild probably do not live more than 2 years (Bronner et al. 1988). Still, without more detailed studies maximum longevity is classified as unknown.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Taylor, P.J., Maree, S. & Monadjem, A.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Cox, N. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because it is relatively widespread, it is common, and its population is not believed to be in decline at present. Additional taxonomic studies might reveal this taxon to be comprised of several species for which a review of the Red List Assessment will be necessary.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
  • 1996
    Lower Risk/least concern
    (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)
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Population

Population
It is a common species.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species at present.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of the species includes several protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Southern African vlei rat

The Southern African Vlei Rat (Otomys irroratus) is a species of rodent in the Otomys genus ("vlei rats") of the family Muridae. This is the type species of the genus.[1] The range extends from the far South Western Cape of South Africa, around the southern and eastern coast and adjacent interior, to subtropical regions in southern Natal. This part of its range includes Lesotho. Further north it no longer occurs around the actual coast. Inland however, its range extends north to tropical areas, nearly to the northern boundary of the Transvaal, including parts of Swaziland. An apparently isolated population occurs still further north in tropical eastern Zimbabwe and adjacent Mozambique.[2] Its habitats include temperate low-altitude swamps and grassland, and subtropical and tropical high-altitude grassland, swamps, and plantations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Genus Otomys, Mammal Species of the World, 3rd ed.
  2. ^ Mills, Gus and Hes, Lex (1997). The Complete Book of Southern African Mammals. Cape Town: Struik Publishers. ISBN 0947430555. 


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