Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Subsaharan species is widely distributed in parts of Central Africa, East Africa and southern Africa. It ranges from the area of the Albertine Rift and southern Kenya in the north of its range, as far south as eastern South Africa and Swaziland.
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Geographic Range

The Angoni Vlei Rat is distributed in parts of South Africa (Meester et al).

Biogeographic Regions: ethiopian (Native )

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

The Angoni Vlei Rat is medium to large in size compared to other murids. Long, soft reddish brown to gray fur covers this small mammal. The throat is often a buffy color (Bronner and Meester, 1988).

Range mass: 25 to 215 g.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It occurs in well-watered savanna grassland, seasonally flooded grassland, wetlands in southern Africa below 1,000 m asl, but in higher elevation grasslands and heath in East Africa. The species can be found in pastureland but usually not when livestock is present. They are usually found near streams.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Angoni Vlei Rat is found mainly in coastal or montane areas. Usually populations exist in wetter habitats but have been observed in desert areas (Bronner and Meester, 1988).

Terrestrial Biomes: desert or dune ; savanna or grassland ; forest

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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

Angoni Vlei Rats are hervivores that eat mainly grasses, reeds, roots, and occasionally bark (Bronner and Meester, 1988).

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

There is not enough data available concerning the reproductive biology of the Angoni Vlei Rat. Breeding has been observed to start at around 4 months of age. Females have up to 3 litters each year and there are estimates of 1-5 young/litter. Breeding coincides with good availability. Young are precocial, which means they are born in a relatively advanced condition of development (Bronner and Meester, 1988).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Taylor, P.J. & Maree, S.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Cox, N. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
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IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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Population

Population
It is common to abundant in suitable habitats.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
In general there are no major threats to this species. In parts of its range it is locally threatened by habitat degradation due to overgrazing of its habitat by domestic livestock.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of the species includes several protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Angoni vlei rat

The Angoni vlei rat (Otomys angoniensis) is a species of rodent in the family Muridae. It is found in Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are moist savanna, temperate grassland, subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, swamps, and pastureland. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

  • Musser, G. G. and M. D. Carleton. 2005. Superfamily Muroidea. pp. 894–1531 in Mammal Species of the World a Taxonomic and Geographic Reference. D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder eds. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.
  • Taylor, P. & Maree, S. 2004. Otomys angoniensis. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 19 July 2007.


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