Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to western and southern Madagascar where it is widely distributed in the dry deciduous forests and grasslands. It ranges from sea level up to around 915 m asl (Carleton and Goodman 2003).
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Geographic Range

Macrotarsomys bastardi is found throughout southern and western Madagascar. (Anderson and Jones 1984, Nowak 1999, Parker 1990, Wilson and Reeder 1993)

Biogeographic Regions: ethiopian (Native )

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Macrotarsomys bastardi is the smallest species of the murid subfamily, Nesomyinae, the Malagasy mice. M. bastardi is similar in appearance to gerbils. Pelage color is brownish fawn on the upper body with a whitish underbelly. Body length ranges from 80 to 100 mm and tail length from 100-145 mm. The tail has a thin tuft of elongated hair at the end. The hind feet are rather large in comparison to body size and range from 22-28 mm long. Ears are from 22 to 25 mm long. The dental formula is 1/1, 0/0, 0/0, 3/3 = 16. Incisors are opisthodont and smooth faced. M. bastardi also has a weakly developed supraorbital shelf and moderately inflated auditory bullae. (Anderson and Jones 1984, Macdonald 1993, Nowak 1999, Parker 1990)

Range mass: 21 to 38 g.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This nocturnal, terrestrial species is found in spiny forests and dry deciduous forests. It can occur in heavily moified habitats outside of forests. Animals spend the day in burrows excavated under rocks, tree stumps and other ground cover. A litter of two to three young are born after a gestation period of around 24 days (Carleton and Goodman 2003).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Preferred habitats for M. bastardi are dry scrublands, dry deciduous forests, and grassland regions. (Wilson and Reeder 1993)

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; scrub forest

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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

Their diet mainly consists of berries, fruits, seeds, roots, and plant stems. Little else is known about their food habits. (Parker 1990)

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

M. bastardi tend to live in pairs. This species is known to have 2-3 young per litter and to breed year round. Average gestation period is 24 days. In some studies females have bitten their mates to death. (Anderson and Jones 1984, Parker 1990)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Goodman, S. & Rakotondravony, D.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Hoffmann, M. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, occurrence in a number of protected areas, tolerance to a degree of habitat modification, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a threatened category.
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US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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Population

Population
It appears to be a relatively common species.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
The major threat to this species is wildfires in the region.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This widely distributed species has been recorded from at least six protected areas including Kirindy Mitea, and Tsimanampetsotsa, Andohahela, and Ankarafantsika National Parks. Further research into the taxonomy, population and distribution of this species is needed.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

There are no known negative affects on humans.

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Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

There are no known positive benefits to humans.

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Wikipedia

Bastard big-footed mouse

The bastard big-footed mouse (Macrotarsomys bastardi) is a species of rodent in the Nesomyidae family. It is found only in Madagascar.

References[edit]

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