Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to Australia, where it is found in a broad semi-circle in eastern Queensland from Paluma and Charters Towers west to Burra Range and Clermont, and south-east to Springsure and Gympie (Menkhorst 2001; Ford and Johnson 2007).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is present in rocky and scrubby areas, preferring hills or ridges with dry open woodlands and a grass-dominated understorey. The species builds mounds of pebbles under which the animals construct burrows to live in, and it is therefore confined to areas with small pebbles (Ford and Johnson 2007; Ford 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Burnett, S. & Aplin, K.

Reviewer/s
Lamoreux, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team) & Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its relatively wide distribution, presumed large population, occurrence in a number of protected areas, and because it is unlikely to be declining at nearly the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category.

History
  • 1996
    Vulnerable
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Population

Population
Its distribution is patchy, scattered in small populations, and poorly known.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The major threats to this species are poorly understood. This species is likely susceptible to predation by introduced foxes, cats, and dogs. It was previously thought that intense fire may be a threat to this species because it destroys available food resources and would result in population declines. However, it was recently found that fire has no effect on this species (F. Ford, manuscript in review).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is present in a large number of conservation areas, including the follow national parks: White Mountains, Peak Range, Carnarvon, Expedition, Minnerva Hills, Blackdown Tableland, Moorrinya, Homevale, and Blackbraes. Further studies are needed into possible threats to this species.
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Wikipedia

Country mouse

The country mouse (Pseudomys patrius) also known as the pebble-mound mouse [1] or eastern pebble mound mouse [2] is a species of rodent in the family Muridae. It is found only in Australia. It is considered to be a rare mouse and was first discovered by Thomas and Dollman in 1909.[2]

Like other pebble-mound mice, the species is known for building shallow burrows with a mound of pebbles surrounding the entrance. This function is understood to be for protection and dew collection. In Queensland the observed mounds in coastal areas have smaller mounds than in drier habitats, reflecting the need to collect more of the scarcer water.[1] The species also lines the tunnel walls with pebbles both for insulation and protection. A further habit is to plug smaller opening to the burrow system with a pebble, so as camouflaging the entrance, and can be removed when there is a need to exit the burrow in times of danger.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Dyke, S V. (1997). "Queensland Pebble-Mound Mice ... Up from the tailings". Australian Nature Magazine. 25/10: 40–47. 
  2. ^ a b AUSTRALIANFAUNA.COM 1909 Eastern Pebble-mound Mouse (Pseudomys patrius)


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