Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Myosorex longicaudatus is known from the southeastern parts of the Cape Province, South Africa. This species was only discovered in 1978. This species generally occurs at elevations up to 2,000 m asl. A population of the subspecies Myosorex longicaudatus boosmai from the Langeberg Mountains, occurs at much higher elevations (up to 3,600 m asl) than any other known populations (Dippenaar 1995).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
M. longicaudatus is found in forests, forests edges, fynbos and boggy grassland. This species needs a moist microhabitat. It is restricted to pristine primary habitat that has not been degraded.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
B1ab(iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Baxter, R.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Cox, N. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Vulnerable because its area of occupancy is less than 2,000 km², its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is continuing decline projected in the extent and quality of its habitat.

History
  • 2004
    Vulnerable
  • 1996
    Vulnerable
  • 1994
    Insufficiently Known
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Insufficiently Known
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Rare
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
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Population

Population
This species is relatively common in suitable habitat. The highest numbers of individuals are found at the forest edge
(Dippenaar, 1995). Population numbers seems to fluctuate and there is an example of a survey finding no specimens in an area where a previous survey had caught quite high numbers.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Climate change is considered to be the principal threat to this species. Habitat in neighbouring areas is arid and unsuitable for this species which depends on a moist habitat. Because of this M. longicaudatus would not be able to move to other areas if the climate in its current range became unsuitable. It is thought that coastal populations might be at less risk than non-coastal populations. The moist habitat of this species is fragmented.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
All forests in South Africa are protected by law, although the degree to which they are protected may vary. This species is also present in protected areas such as the Diepwalle Forest Reserve and Tzutzu Kama Coastal Park.
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Wikipedia

Long-tailed forest shrew

The long-tailed forest shrew (Myosorex longicaudatus) is a species of mammal in the Soricidae family. It is endemic to South Africa. Its natural habitats are Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation and swamps.

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