Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Pyrrhura calliptera occurs in the East Andes of Colombia, where it was formerly present on both slopes, but has been recorded at only one west slope location (in Santander) in modern times. On the east slope, there are recent records from Norte de Santander, in Farallon de Medina (Cundinamarca) (Cortés-Herrera et al. 2007) and Ramiriquy and Soata (Boyacá) (Cortés-Herrera et al. 2007). It could occur as far south as Páramo de Sumapaz, Meta. Although locally numerous, populations have become fragmented and have declined rapidly, especially in Cundinamarca. The total population has been estimated at 5,000-10,000 individuals (Salaman 2000).

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Range

E Andes of Colombia (Boyacá and Cundinamarca).

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It occupies upper subtropical and temperate forest (1,850-3,000 m), elfin woodland and second growth (3,000-3,400 m), and adjacent areas of páramo, subpáramo and agricultural land. It may make seasonal altitudinal movements (F. G. Stiles in litt. 1999). The diet consists of fruit (including plants from the Ericaceae, Lauraceae, Melastomataceae and Clusiaceae [Cortés-Herrera et al. 2007]), seeds and cultivated maize, but the largest flocks were observed in open areas where the parakeets fed on grass leaves and seeds (O. Cortés in litt. 2012). Breeding condition birds have been taken in August and October and breeding has been noted between November and January at Fusagasuga, Farallon de Medina and Soata (Cortés-Herrera et al. 2007), and from September to February in Chingaza National Park (Arenas-Mosquera 2011).


Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
A2cd+3cd+4cd;B1ab(i,ii,iii,v)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s
Cortes, O., Salaman, P. & Stiles, F.
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Population

Population
The population is estimated to number 5,000-10,000 individuals, roughly equating to 3,300-6,700 mature individuals.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Past and continuing forest destruction and fragmentation through logging, conversion to agriculture, human settlement and development of the road network have been extensive (Salaman 2000), especially below 2,500 m on the west slope (Stattersfield et al. 1998). The greatest current threats to forest in the Eastern Cordillera are cattle grazing and burning for agriculture (Cortés-Herrera et al. 2007). On the east slope, logging is fairly widespread, although some large areas of intact habitat persist ( Stiles 1992, P. G. W. Salaman in litt. 1999). Low levels of selective logging affect Guanentá-Alto Río Fonce Fauna and Flora Sanctuary. It is persecuted by local farmers as a crop-pest, a problem which may intensify as further forest is cleared for agriculture. Locally, it is kept as a pet, but it is unaffected by international trade. Nest site availability is considered the main population limiting factor (Anon 2005).

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Conservation Actions Underway
CITES Appendix II. It is common in Chingaza National Park and the adjacent Río Blanco-Olivares Forest Reserve and Carpanta Biological Reserve (Wege and Long 1995, F. G. Stiles in litt. 1999), and occurs in reserves at Soata, Farallones de Medina and Guayabetal (Cortés-Herrera et al. 2007). West-slope records in c.1980 were from forest now protected by Guanentá-Alto Río Fonce Fauna and Flora Sanctuary, Santander (Wege and Long 1995, J. I. Hernández Camacho unpublished data). Experimental nest boxes have been occupied in Chingaza National Park (Anon 2005, Arenas-Mosquera 2011) and Farallones de Medina (O. Cortés in litt. 2012).

Conservation Actions Proposed
Search for the species in Sumapaz National Park. Confirm its occurrence at Macizo de Tamá, Norte de Santander, and search in the adjacent El Tamá National Park, Venezuela. Study population densities in different forest-types and estimate current population (Salaman 2000). Strengthen the effective protection of Chingaza National Park and adjacent protected areas. Formally protect Vereda Monterredondo. Monitor success of nest boxes in Chingaza National Park, and monitor birds at Soata (Cortés-Herrera et al. 2007).

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Wikipedia

Flame-winged parakeet

The flame-winged parakeet (Pyrrhura calliptera), also known as the brown-breasted parakeet, is a species of parrot in the Psittacidae family. It is endemic to forest edge and shrub at altitudes of 1700–3400 m. on the east Andean slope in Colombia. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

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