Overview

Brief Summary

The Nanday Conure (Nandayus nenday) occurs in central-southern South America (southeastern Bolivia and southwestern Brazil through central Paraguay to northern Argentina), where it is generally found in open country, sometimes walking on the ground; feral populations occur elsewhere (e.g., Buenos Aires, California, and Florida). Nanday Conures often associate with Monk Parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) in mixed flocks and are usually quite tame and approachable. They are generally common and locally abundant.

Nanday Conures inhabit open lowlands up to around 800 m, including moister parts of the eastern chaco, pantanal, and cattle rangelands with palms. They are gregarious, with groups of up to a dozen birds when breeding and several hundred gathered when roosting. They are often seen drinking at waterholes. They nest in cavities in trees or large fenceposts, producing a clutch of 4 eggs.

According to a mtDNA-based phylogenetic analysis of the genus Aratinga by Ribas and Miyaki (2004), the Nanday Conure forms a monophyletic group with the Sun Conure (A. solstitialis), Jenday Conure (A. jandaya), and Golden-capped Conure (A. auricapilla).

(Collar 1997 and references therein; Juniper and Parr 1998 and references therein)

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Distribution

Range

Pantanal of se Bolivia, sw Brazil, Paraguay and n Argentina.
  • Clements, J. F., T. S. Schulenberg, M. J. Iliff, D. Roberson, T. A. Fredericks, B. L. Sullivan, and C. L. Wood. 2014. The eBird/Clements checklist of birds of the world: Version 6.9. Downloaded from http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/download/

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 18.7 years (captivity) Observations: One specimen lived 18.7 years in captivity (Brouwer et al. 2000).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Nandayus nenday

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Nandayus nenday

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be increasing, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

History
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
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