Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)) British Columbia south to California, western Nevada, and Baja California Norte, Mexico.

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Ecology

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: > 300

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Global Abundance

100,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Bombus vosnesenskii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Although it has a somewhat modest West Coast range, this is a very common bumblebee in many areas. It seems to benefit from urbanization (McFrederick and Lebuhn (2006) since it does well in urban parks and gardens and thrives in some agricultural systems (Rao and Stephen, 2010). It is often by far the most common bumblebee in such places and may exclude other species. It also occurs in more natural systems but is not as dominant in these. Like several others in its subgenus, this one seems to be increasing in at least some parts of its range. Species of this subgenus are apparently relatively immune to exotic diseases that are widely blamed for declines in some other subgenera.

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Not intrinsically vulnerable

Environmental Specificity: Broad. Generalist or community with all key requirements common.

Other Considerations: This species has a large literature in pollination ecology and is a potentially useful species for commercial pollination projects.

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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable to increase of 25%

Comments: Has increased in some urban areas, for example around San Francisco.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Low

Comments: Most of the usual threats do not apply, for example this species is probably little affected by exotic diseases, apparently benefits from many forms of habitat conversion, e.g. urbanization and some forms of agriculture which seem to give it an advantage over related species. Obviously pesticides could have locally negative impacts.

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Management

Global Protection: Very many (>40) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

Comments: This species hardly needs protection. It thrives in urban areas and certain types of agricultural landscapes.

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Wikipedia

Bombus vosnesenskii

The Yellow-faced Bumble Bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) is a species of bumblebee. It is native to the west coast of North America, where it distributed from British Columbia to Baja California.[1]

This species is common in its range and can be found in urban and agricultural areas.[1]

Description[edit]

In this species, the queen is 1.4 to 1.9 centimetres long, and the workers and males are up to 1.4 centimetres long.[2] It is characterized by the yellow coloration of the head pile, the mostly black thorax and abdomen, a single yellow thoracic stripe on the lower abdomen, and blackish wings.[3]

Life cycle[edit]

The overwintering queen first appears during spring and establishes underground colonies. After laying her first brood she and the workers incubate the cluster until the adults emerge. The fuel for their thermoregulation during incubation is derived from nectar and pollen, and honey between foraging trips.[4]

Physiology[edit]

Bombus vosnesenskii, like most bumblebees, uses thermoregulation to maintain a stable body temperature several degrees above the ambient temperature. At rest, bumblebees have temperatures close to ambient temperature. To generate power for flight, bumblebees need to raise the temperature of the flight muscles to above 30 °C (86 °F).[5] In B. vosnesenskii heat is transferred from the thorax to the abdomen by changes in hemolymph flow in the petiole, the narrow region between the abdomen and thorax. At low ambient temperature, the hemolymph flows from the thorax and abdomen simultaneously. As a result, the countercurrent exchange of heat in the petiole retains most of the energy in the thorax. When the ambient temperature is high, the countercurrent exchange is reduced such that heat is transferred from the thorax to the abdomen.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bombus vosnesenskii. NatureServe. 2012.
  2. ^ Ebeling, R. Chapter 9, part 2: Pests Attacking Man and His Pets. Urban Entomology. UC Riverside. 2002.
  3. ^ Kweskin, M. P. (March 31, 1997). "Bombus vosnesenskii Radoszkowski, 1862". The Bumblebees of Evergreen. The Evergreen State College. 
  4. ^ Goulson, D. (2003). Bumblebees: Their Behaviour and Ecology. Oxford University Press. p. 13. ISBN 978-0-19-852606-3. 
  5. ^ Heinrich, B. (1972). "Patterns of endothermy in bumblebee queens, drones and workers". Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology 77 (1): 65–79. doi:10.1007/BF00696520. 
  6. ^ Roberts, S.P. & Harrison, J.F. (1998). "Mechanisms of thermoregulation in flying bees". American Zoologist 38 (3): 492–502. doi:10.1093/icb/38.3.492. 
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Subgenus: Pyrobombus

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