Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1 specimen in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -1 - -1
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Associations

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
gregarious larva of Homalotylus eytelweini is endoparasitoid of larva of Chilocorus bipustulatus

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Phalacrotophora fasciata is endoparasitoid of pupa (newly formed) of Chilocorus bipustulatus

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
gregarious (ave. 6) larva of Tetrastichus coccinellae is endoparasitoid of larva of Chilocorus bipustulatus

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Chilocorus bipustulatus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Chilocorus bipustulatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Chilocorus bipustulatus

Chilocorus bipustulatus, the heather ladybird,[1] is a beetle species belonging to the family Coccinellidae, subfamily Chilocorinae.[1]

These beetles are found in most of Europe, in East Palearctic ecozone, in the Near East and in North Africa.[2]

The elytra of this small beetle have a shining brown colour with two reddish-orange spots on each elytron (hence the Latin word bipustulatus, meaning two-blistered). Sometime three spots run in an horizontal line and join into two larger stains.

The mature larva is about 5 millimetres (0.20 in) long. Wintering occurs as an adult. The adults grow up to 3–5 millimetres (0.12–0.20 in) long and can be encountered from May through October.

Heather ladybirds feed on aphids and scale insects, small insects mainly belonging to the family Coccidae and Diaspididae (Saissetia oleae, Aspidiotus nerii, Chionaspis salicis, Chrysomphalus aonidum, Pseudaulacaspis pentagona, Planococcus citri, etc.). Therefore this species has been introduced worldwide for biological control in case of infestations.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Biolib
  2. ^ Fauna Europaea
  3. ^ Commercially used biological control agents
  4. ^ Mansour, Rramzi; Mkaouar, Rim; Lebdi, Kaouthar Grissa; Suma, Pompeo and Russo, Agatino (2011). "A survey of scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) occurring on olives in Tunisia". Journal of Entomological and Acarological Research 43 (3): 315–322. 
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Source: Wikipedia

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