Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Animal / predator
Anystis agilis is predator of egg of Bruchidius villosus

Animal / parasitoid
larva of Baryscapus endemus is parasitoid of larva of Bruchidius villosus

Foodplant / feeds on
adult of Bruchidius villosus feeds on pollen of Cytisus scoparius
Remarks: season: late 4

Plant / associate
adult of Bruchidius villosus is associated with Cytisus

Plant / associate
adult of Bruchidius villosus is associated with Genista

Plant / associate
adult of Bruchidius villosus is associated with Laburnum

Foodplant / feeds on
adult (young) of Bruchidius villosus feeds on pollen of Ulex

Plant / associate
adult of Bruchidius villosus is associated with flower of Achillea millefolium

Plant / associate
adult of Bruchidius villosus is associated with flower of Heracleum sphondylium

Plant / associate
adult of Bruchidius villosus is associated with flower of Holcus lanatus

Animal / parasitoid
larva of Dinarmus acutus is parasitoid of Bruchidius villosus
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Animal / parasitoid
larva of Eupelmus urozonus is parasitoid of Bruchidius villosus

Animal / parasitoid
larva of Pteromalus bruchidii is parasitoid of Bruchidius villosus
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Animal / parasitoid / ectoparasitoid
larva of Pteromalus sequesta is ectoparasitoid of pupa of Bruchidius villosus

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Triaspis sp. nr. obscurellus is endoparasitoid of larva of Bruchidius villosus

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
solitary larva of Trichogramma is endoparasitoid of egg of Bruchidius villosus

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Bruchidius villosus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 9
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data: Bruchidius villosus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.   Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.  Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

GGATCA------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------CCTGATATAGCATTCCCTCGAATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGACTTCTACCACCCTCTCTAACTCTTCTTCTTATAAGAAGTTTAGTAGAAAGAGGAGCTGGTACAGGATGAACTGTATACCCCCCTTTAGCCAGTAATATTGCCCATGGTGGATCTTCTGTAGATTTAGCTATTTTTAGTTTACATCTAGCAGGAATCTCCTCTATTCTAGGTGCAGTTAATTTTATTACTACTGTCATTAATATACGACCTAATGGAATAAGAATAGACCGAATACCCCTGTTTTCTTGAGCAGTCTTGATTACAGCCATCCTATTACTTCTATCATTACCTGTTTTAGCAGGAGCTATCACTATGCTTTTAACAGACCGAAATTTAAATACTTCTTTCTTTGATCCAGCAGGAGGAGGAGACCCAATTTTATATCAACATTTATTTTGATTTTTTGGTCATCCAGAAGTTTATATTTTAATTTTACCG
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Bruchidius villosus

Bruchidius villosus is a species of bean weevil known by the common names broom seed beetle and Scotch broom bruchid. This beetle is used as an agent of biological pest control against the noxious weed known as Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius).

This is a dark gray weevil about two millimeters long. The female lays about ten eggs on the seed pod of the plant. The larva hatches from the egg at the point it is attached to the pod and burrows into the pod, where it develops and feeds on the seeds. The larva is one to two millimeters long and gelatinous white. It pupates in the seed coat. When the seed pod ripens and splits open, adult weevils emerge.

This beetle is native to Europe. It was introduced to the United States by accident but was found to drastically reduce seed production in Scotch broom, its host plant. It became one of the newest insects to be deliberately released for the control of the plant in the 1990s. Its viability as a biocontrol agent is under study. It is used less often in New Zealand because it was found to attack plants other than its target when introduced there.

References[edit]

  • Coombs, E. M., et al., Eds. (2004). Biological Control of Invasive Plants in the United States. Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 162.
  • Sheppard, A., M. Haines & T. Thomann. (2006). Native-range research assists risk analysis for non-targets in weed biological control: the cautionary tale of the broom seed beetle. Aust J Entom 45:4 292-97.
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