Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

Small to medium size (22.6 to 32.0 mm), elongate body (Larson et al. 2000). Brown-black to black - many with green appearance. Basal segments of antennae yellow, terminal segments darker. All pronotal margins bordered with yellow. Lateral border of elytra yellow, not reaching apex. Females with yellow striae and dark ridges. Yellow ventral surface, except brown-black metasternum, reddish metacoxa, margins of abdominal sterna narrowly black and thoracic sclerites with narrowly black margins. Dark basolateral marking on second and third sterna. Yellow or reddish legs. 
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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In Alberta this species has been recorded from most regions. This species ranges from Alaska to Newfoundland; known from all provinces and states along the USA-Canada border, as far south as Colorado (Larson et al. 2000, Partridge and Lauff 1999).
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Ecology

Habitat

Permanent lakes, ponds and bogs (Larson et al. 2000). Associated with aquatic macrophytes.
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Trophic Strategy

Predatory - active swimmers. Invertebrate and fish larvae prey. Suggestion that diet primarily composed of dead animal matter (Aiken and Leggett 1984). Predation rates highest at night (Aiken 1986).
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Adult population peak in late spring, declining into fall (Aiken and Wilkinson 1985).
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Life Cycle

Overwinter as adults in permanent waters (Larson et al. 2000). Early spring mating (Aiken 1992). Univoltine (Aiken and Wilkinson 1985). Strong swimmers, hind legs move together while swimming. Adults attracted to lights.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dytiscus alaskanus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 16
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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No special status (IUCN 2002).
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