Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description of Eudorina

Colonies cylindrical, ellipsoidal or nearly spherical; composed of (8), 16, 32, 64 (or 128) µmostly 32) cells embedded in the periphery of a common gelatinous matrix; colonial boundary not penetrating between cells into centre of colony, each cell surrounded tightly by separate fibrillar zone (cellular envelope) of extracellular matrix within tripartite colonial boundary; cells separated from each other by spaces; cells spherical to ovoid, with 2 equal-length apical flagella; chloroplast cup-shaped, sometimes radially striated; pyrenoids one to many; eyespot present; nucleus more or less central; contractile vacuoles 2, anterior, and several others randomly distributed; asexual reproduction with plakeal stage and inversion to form daughter colonies within transparent vesicles in the parental gelatinous matrix, smaller cells often not undergoing division if colony contains different sizes of cells; sexual reproduction anisogamous, homothallic or heterothallic, with large, biflagellate female gametes (eggs) and packets of small, biflagellate male gametes (sperm); male gametes with a slender cytoplasmic protrusion at base of flagella; zygotes spherical, smooth-walled, often with reddish contents; on germination, one or two biflagellate gone cells escaping from zygote wall and dividing into a gone colony; aplanospores observed; nutrition possibly obligately phototrophic; freshwater, widely distributed in pools, ditches, plankton of softwater lakes.
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biopedia

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Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
Rhizophydium contractophilum parasitises Eudorina

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:21Public Records:20
Specimens with Sequences:21Public Species:7
Specimens with Barcodes:18Public BINs:0
Species:7         
Species With Barcodes:6         
          
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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Eudorina

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Eudorina

Eudorina is a genus of colonial green algae, specifically of the Volvocaceae.[1] Eudorina colonies consist of 16, 32 or 64 individual cells grouped together. Each individual cell contains flagella which allow the colony to move as a whole when the individual cells beat their flagella together. Description by GM Smith (1920, p 95):[2]

Eudorina Ehrenberg 1832.

Colonies always motile, spherical or slightly elongate, of 16-32-64 cells lying some distance from one another and arranged to form a hollow sphere near the periphery of the homogeneous, hyaline, gelatinous envelope. Cells spherical, with or without a beak at the point of origin of the two cilia. Cilia parallel while passing through the colonial envelope and then widely divergent. Chloroplast single, cupshaped, filling practically the whole cell and generally with several pyrenoids. Cells with a firm wall, one or two anterior contractile vacuoles, and a single conspicuous eyespot near the base of the cilia.

Asexual reproduction by a simultaneous division of all cells to form autocolonies which are liberated by a rupture of the colonial envelope.

Sexual reproduction heterogamous, dioecious, with all cells of a colony developing into large immobile oospheres or plate-like masses of 32-64 fusiform antherozoids; or monoecious with four cells forming antherozoids and the remainder oospheres. Zygote smooth-walled.

Eudorina may be confused with young colonies of Pleodorina, which are very similar (Smith, 1920, p 97.)[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ See the NCBI webpage on Eudorina. Data extracted from the "NCBI taxonomy resources". National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved 2007-03-19. 
  2. ^ a b Smith, GM. Phytoplankton of Inland Lakes of Wisconsin, Part I, Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, Madison, WI. (1920).

Scientific journals[edit]

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