Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Amphipoda (Amphipoda spp.) is prey of:
Decapoda
Fundulus heteroclitus
Actinopterygii
Hymenoptera
Sturnidae
Charadrius morinellus
Hymenolepididae
Cambarus bartonii
Aves
Chaetognatha
Medusae
Ctenophora
Partnuniella thermalis
Thermacarus nevadensis
Tachytrechus angustipennis
Arachnida
organic stuff
Gobiidae
Stomatopoda
Anomura
Gastropoda
Priapula
Polychaeta
Ophiuroidea
Nemertines
Nereidae
Hesionidae
Glyceridae
Onuphidae
Symphurus plagisua
Anchoa mitchilli
Menidia beryllina
Gobiosoma robustum
Microgobius gulosus
Lagodon rhomboides
Leiostomus xanthurus
Syngnathus scovelli
Hippocampus zosterae
Laridae
Cyprinodon variegatus
Sciaenops ocellatus
Anatidae
Fundulus confluentus
Fundulus similis
Adinia xenica
sediment POC
Pinixia floridana
Neopanope texana
Processa bermudiensis
Penaeus duoarum
Palaemonetes floridanus
Aoteapsyche
Salmo trutta
Psilachorema bidens
Galaxias

Based on studies in:
USA: Rhode Island (Marine)
Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands shelf (Reef)
USA: California (Coastal)
New Zealand (Grassland)
USA: Florida, South Florida (Swamp)
USA (Temporary pool)
Pacific (Tropical)
USA: Florida (Estuarine)
New Zealand: Otago, Blackrock, Lee catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Stony, Sutton catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Broad, Lee catchment (River)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • S. W. Nixon and C. A. Oviatt, Ecology of a New England salt marsh, Ecol. Monogr. 43:463-498, from p. 491 (1973).
  • L. D. Harris and G. B. Bowman, Vertebrate predator subsystem. In: Grasslands, Systems Analysis and Man, A. I. Breymeyer and G. M. Van Dyne, Eds. (International Biological Programme Series, no. 19, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, England, 1980), pp. 591-
  • J. W. Nybakken, Marine Biology: An Ecological Approach (Harper and Row, New York, 1982), from p. 242.
  • T. S. Petipa, Trophic relationships in communities and the functioning of marine ecosystems: I. Studies in trophic relationships in pelagic communities of the southern seas of the USSR and in the tropical Pacific. In: Marine Production Mechanisms, M. J. D
  • Townsend, CR, Thompson, RM, McIntosh, AR, Kilroy, C, Edwards, ED, Scarsbrook, MR. 1998. Disturbance, resource supply and food-web architecture in streams. Ecology Letters 1:200-209.
  • K. Paviour-Smith, The biotic community of a salt meadow in New Zealand, Trans. R. Soc. N.Z. 83(3):525-554, from p. 542 (1956).
  • N. C. Collins, R. Mitchell and R. G. Wiegert, 1976. Functional analysis of a thermal spring ecosystem, with an evaluation of the role of consumers. Ecology 57:1221-1232, from p. 1222.
  • Opitz S (1996) Trophic interactions in Caribbean coral reefs. ICLARM Tech Rep 43, Manila, Philippines
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Known prey organisms

Amphipoda (Amphipoda spp.) preys on:
detritus
humus
periphyton
phytoplankton
Infusoria
Radiolaria
Copepoda
Calanus
Oithona-Oncaea type
Cyanobacteria
Carangidae
Actinopterygii
Hemiramphidae
decomposers/microfauna
organic stuff
Ectoprocta
Cirripedia
Ascidia
Porifera
Cnidaria
Anthozoa
algae
bacteria
Microfauna
macrophytes
Achnanthes
Cocconeis
Eunotia
Fragilaria vaucheriae
Navicula bicephala
Microspora
Bryophyta
Achnanthes lanceolata
Cymbella kappii
Cymbella minuta
Frustulia rhomboides
Gomphonema cf. olivaceum
Gomphonema parvulum
Gomphonema subclavatum
Aulacoseira
Meridion circulare
Navicula cryptocephala
Navicula
Nitzschia
Ulothrix
Cyclotella
Navicula avenacea
Rhoicosphenia curvata
Surirella
Synedra ulna
Audouinella
Diatoma heimale
Tabellaria flocculosa
Cymbella sinuata
Gomphoneis herculeana
Achnanthes saxonica
Cymbella
Gomphonema truncatum
Hantzschia
Pinnularia
Oedogonium
Unknown green algal filaments

Based on studies in:
USA: Rhode Island (Marine)
USA: Florida, South Florida (Swamp)
USA: California (Coastal)
Pacific (Tropical)
New Zealand: Otago, Blackrock, Lee catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Broad, Lee catchment (River)
New Zealand: South Island, Canton Creek, Taieri River, Lee catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Dempster's Stream, Taieri River, 3 O'Clock catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, German, Kye Burn catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Little Kye, Kye Burn catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Stony, Sutton catchment (River)
New Zealand (Grassland)
Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands shelf (Reef)
USA: Florida (Estuarine)
USA (Temporary pool)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • S. W. Nixon and C. A. Oviatt, Ecology of a New England salt marsh, Ecol. Monogr. 43:463-498, from p. 491 (1973).
  • L. D. Harris and G. B. Bowman, Vertebrate predator subsystem. In: Grasslands, Systems Analysis and Man, A. I. Breymeyer and G. M. Van Dyne, Eds. (International Biological Programme Series, no. 19, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, England, 1980), pp. 591-
  • J. W. Nybakken, Marine Biology: An Ecological Approach (Harper and Row, New York, 1982), from p. 242.
  • T. S. Petipa, Trophic relationships in communities and the functioning of marine ecosystems: I. Studies in trophic relationships in pelagic communities of the southern seas of the USSR and in the tropical Pacific. In: Marine Production Mechanisms, M. J. D
  • S. W. Nixon and C. A. Oviatt, Ecology of a New England salt marsh, Ecol. Monog. 43:463-498, from p. 491 (1973).
  • Townsend, CR, Thompson, RM, McIntosh, AR, Kilroy, C, Edwards, ED, Scarsbrook, MR. 1998. Disturbance, resource supply and food-web architecture in streams. Ecology Letters 1:200-209.
  • Thompson, RM and Townsend, CR. 1999. The effect of seasonal variation on the community structure and food-web attributes of two streams: implications for food-web science. Oikos 87: 75-88.
  • K. Paviour-Smith, The biotic community of a salt meadow in New Zealand, Trans. R. Soc. N.Z. 83(3):525-554, from p. 542 (1956).
  • N. C. Collins, R. Mitchell and R. G. Wiegert, 1976. Functional analysis of a thermal spring ecosystem, with an evaluation of the role of consumers. Ecology 57:1221-1232, from p. 1222.
  • Opitz S (1996) Trophic interactions in Caribbean coral reefs. ICLARM Tech Rep 43, Manila, Philippines
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:19,559Public Records:12,333
Specimens with Sequences:14,949Public Species:573
Specimens with Barcodes:13,235Public BINs:1,732
Species:1,075         
Species With Barcodes:849         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Amphipoda

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!