Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Glabrous eglandular shrub to 2 m; stem swollen at the base. Latex watery. Leaves long-petiolate, peltate; lamina 3-5-lobed, green above, paler beneath; lobes entire. Inflorescence a dense corymb. Petals scarlet. Fruit 3-lobed.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

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Worldwide distribution

Native to C America; widely cultivated in the tropics.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Erect shrubs to 2 m tall, with woody stem swollen at base or lower part; branches stout and short, fleshy, sparsely lenticellate. Stipules spiniform, persistent leaf scar large and prominent; petiole 8-10 cm, glabrous; leaf blade peltate, rotund to elliptic, 8-18(-25) × 6-16 cm, nitid green adaxially, gray-green abaxially, glabrous on both surfaces, base truncate or obtuse, margin entire or shallowly 2-6-lobed, apex obtuse; palmate veins 6-8. Inflorescences terminal, long pedunculate, branching short, red; calyx ca. 2 mm; sepals rotund, ca. 1 mm; petals obovate-oblong, ca. 6 mm, red; stamens 6-8, connate at base; anthers nearly as long as filaments; ovary glabrous; styles 3, connate at base, bifid at apex. Capsules ellipsoidal, 1.3-1.8 × ca. 1.5 cm, with 3 longitudinal grooves. Seeds ca. 1.1 cm, smooth. Fl. and fr. almost throughout year.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Cultivated for medicine and ornamental purposes. Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan, Yunnan [native to Central America; widely introduced].
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Jatropha podagrica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Jatropha podagrica

Jatropha podagrica is a species of plants known by several English common names, including Buddha belly plant, bottleplant shrub, gout plant, purging-nut, Guatemalan rhubarb, and goutystalk nettlespurge. It is native to the tropical Americas but it is propagated as an ornamental plant in many parts of the world.

The stem is swollen into vasculum at the base and filled with thin sap. The plant bears bright red coral-like flowers throughout the year. All parts, especially the seeds, of the plant contain the toxic curcin, making it poisonous.

Jatropha podagrica is also known for its incredible ability to attract a variety of butterflies wherever it is grown.

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Notes

Comments

All parts are used as medicine for reduction of swelling, for pain relief, and to detoxify snakebites.
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