Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Magnolia amazonica is native to the lower western Amazon River Basin occurring in Brazil (in the states of Pará and Amazonas), Peru (in the state of Junin), in Bolivia and Ecuador. The EOO calculated by GeoCAT based on collections but excluding Brazil is 922,190 km2.
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Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Talauma amazonica Ducke
Catalog Number: US 1442072
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Ducke
Year Collected: 1922
Locality: Near Tapajoz., Pará, Brazil, South America
  • Isotype: Ducke, A. 1925. Arch. Jard. Bot. Rio de Janeiro. 4: 11.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Magnolia amazonica is a flowering evergreen tree which grows up to 20 metres high in tropical lowland rain forests. Its creamy white flowers reportedly open at night. This species is the only species of Magnoliaceae to be found in hot humid amazon basin.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
Khela, S.

Reviewer/s
Oldfield, S.

Contributor/s

Justification
Magnolia amazonica is classified as Least Concern due to its wide distribution. The threats, if any, are yet to be described. It is possible this species may be declining due to deforestation and changes in land use.
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Population

Population
There is no detailed information known but it is found over a wide area.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Threats are not known in detail.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation actions in place. It does not exist in ex situ collections.
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Wikipedia

Magnolia amazonica

Magnolia amazonica is a flowering evergreen tree of the Magnoliaceae family native to the lower western Amazon River Basin, including Peru and Brazil.

Description[edit]

Magnolia amazonica grows up to 20 metres (66 ft) high, in terra firma tropical lowland forests. Leaves are elliptic, 11 - 28.5 cm long and 4.2 - 10.5 cm broad. The creamy white fragrant flowers reportedly open at night, petals can be 6 – 7 cm long.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ducke, A. Talauma amazonica. In: Archivos do Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro 4: 11. 1925.
  2. ^ Lozano-Contreras, G. Dugandiodendron y Talauma (Magnoliaceae) en el Neotrópico. Pp: 83, 85, 86. Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas. Bogotá 1994



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