Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Magnolia obovata is native to Japan (Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu) at elevations between 600 and 1,680 m asl and the Kuril Islands of Russia. It grows at sea level up to 1,800 m asl. Specimens have been collected from Japan and Korea from Gyeonggi-do Pocheon-gun (Korea Biodiversity Information System, GBIF). On the Kuril Islands the broadleaved mixed forests occur at approximately 100-300 m asl. A previous study showed this species to occur in Ogawa Forest Preserve, Japan at elevations between 610 and 660 m asl (Isagi et al. 2000). This species has also been studied in the Shirakami Mountains in Japan where the forests consist of a mixture of of beech, maple and magnolia trees at elevations between 700 and 1,100 m asl (Sato and Sekiguchi 2005).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Magnolia obovata is found growing sporadically on damp to mesic places such as margins of deciduous broadleaved forests. It is a large and common deciduous tree 15–30 m tall, with slate grey bark. Its large flowers do not secrete nectar, and are primarily pollinated by beetles. In temperate forests in Japan, a few dominant tree species often occupy a large proportion of the canopy, for example Fagus crenata, and the rest of the canopy is composed of tree species occurring at relatively low density such as Kalopanax pictus, Cornus controversa, Aesculus turbinata, Magnolia obovata, Magnolia salicifolia and Pterocarya rhoifolia (Isagi et al. 2000).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Magnolia obovata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
Khela, S.

Reviewer/s
Oldfield, S.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is widespread in Japan but the standing density of adult trees in some forests is relatively low at a few trees per hectare and inbreeding may be a threat. There appear to be no significant threats to the species overall at present.
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Population

Population
In Japanese temperate forests, species such as magnolia are common and dominate the ecosystem as a whole (Iagi et al. 1999). The distance between trees is a major factor in determining the degree of inbreeding however the populations of Magnolia obovata maintain high inbreeding depression at both early and late life stages, resulting in a low level of inbreeding despite a high primary selfing rate. The inbreeding depression for late survival appears to play a central role in the maintenance of reproductive traits that promote outcrossing in M. obovata. (Ishida 2006, Ishida 2008).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species at present however individuals may be exposed to avalanches and landslides at higher elevations.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no conservation actions in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Magnolia obovata

Magnolia obovata (common names Japanese Bigleaf Magnolia and Japanese whitebark magnolia) is a species of Magnolia, native to Japan and the adjacent Kurile Islands. It grows at altitudes of sea level up to 1,800 m in mixed broadleaf forest.

Description[edit]

It is a medium-sized deciduous tree 15–30 m tall, with slate grey bark. The leaves are large, 16–38 cm (rarely to 50 cm) long and 9–20 cm (rarely 25 cm) broad, leathery, green above, silvery or greyish pubescent below, and with an acute apex. They are held in whorls of five to eight at the end of each shoot. The flowers are also large, cup-shaped, 15–20 cm diameter, with 9-12 creamy, fleshy tepals, red stamens; they have a strong scent, and are produced in early summer after the leaves expand. The fruit is an oblong-cylindric aggregate of follicles 12–20 cm long and 6 cm broad, bright pinkish red, each follicle containing one or two black seeds with a fleshy orange-red coating.

Uses[edit]

The wood is strong, light, and easy to work, sought by craftsmen. In parts of Japan the large leaves are used for wrapping food, and also as a makeshift dish to grill meat or vegetables, such as leeks, mushrooms and miso in hoba miso.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Magnolia obovata information from NPGS/GRIN". GRIN. USDA. April 19, 2007. Retrieved June 11, 2009. 
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