Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Quercus laceyi Small:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee, e. 1997. Magnoliidae and Hamamelidae. 3: i–xxiii, 1–590. In Fl. N. Amer. Oxford University Press, New York.   http://www.tropicos.org/Reference/24627 External link.
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Tex.; Mexico (Coahuila and Nuevo León).
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Global Range: Southern Edwards Plateau ; disjunct on the Llano Uplift of central Texas (Lemke, 1994). Mexico.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees , deciduous, to 5-8(-10) m. Bark light colored, papery or scaly. Twigs gray, 1.5-2 mm diam., pubescent with erect stellate hairs, these soon shed, at maturity reddish and pruinose to tan and glabrous. Buds brown, ovoid to ovoid-lanceoloid, 1.5-3 × 1-2 mm, apex acute, glabrous. Leaves: petiole (3-)5-9(-12) mm. Leaf blade blue-green, glaucous, obovate or elliptic, (20-)40-90(-210) × (20-)30-60(-110) mm, thin, base cuneate and decurrent on petiole to rounded or rarely somewhat cordate, margins thin, flat, entire to shallowly lobed or (rarely in shade forms) deeply lobed, lobes if present oblong, squarish, often retuse, secondary veins 6-9 on each side, each terminating in tooth or arching near margins, apex broadly rounded, retuse; surfaces abaxially whitish, with erect stellate hairs, hairs shed as leaves expand, becoming glabrous, glaucous, adaxially glabrous, glaucous. Acorns annual, solitary or paired, subsessile or on short peduncle to 10(-20) mm in leaf axil; cup saucer-shaped or shallowly cup-shaped, 4-7 mm deep × 10-12(-18) mm wide, enclosing 1/3 nut or less, scales moderately tuberculate, finely tomentose; nut oblong or barrel-shaped, often flattened at both ends, (11-)13-15(-20) × 9-11(-14) mm. Cotyledons distinct.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Quercus breviloba (Torrey) Sargent subsp. laceyi (Small) A. Camus
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Ecology

Habitat

Limestone hills, woodlands and riparian forests, canyons and streamsides; 350-2200m.
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Comments: Correll and Johnston (1970) data for Quercus glaucoides notes limestone escarpment and canyons of the Edwards Plateau.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering in spring.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Per Bill Carr, Texas Conservation Data Center: "Quercus laceyi occurs in 10-15 counties on the Edwards Plateau of south-central Texas. In some of those counties, most notably those along the Southern Balcones Escarpment (the dissected southern edge of the Edwards Plateau), Quercus laceyi is not only present but a dominant species. It is the defining species-- not just the defining oak-- of woodlands on steep rocky upper slopes of most or all of the canyons systems in Bandera, Kerr and Real counties. It becomes a bit scarce in the western part of its Texas range (e.g., Val Verde Co.) presumably due to increasing aridity. It's also scarce in the eastern part of its range, e.g., Hays and Llano counties. Note that Quercus laceyi also occurs in Coahuila, Nuevo León and Tamaulipas, but in that part of the world it is largely confined to isolated mountain ranges. Stein, Binion & Acciavatti (2003) provide a map that demonstrates the discontinuous distribution of Lacey oak in Mexico."

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Wikipedia

Quercus laceyi

Quercus laceyi, the Lacey Oak, is a small to medium-size deciduous Oak tree which is native to Northeast Mexico and to the Texas Hill Country in Texas, United States.

Quercus laceyi seldom grows more than 35 feet (11 meters) tall, and has a stocky trunk. Its blue-green leaves are oblong and shallowly lobed to unlobed, but shade leaves can be deeply lobed; they most often turn yellow or brown in autumn.

Taxonomy

Quercus laceyi has been often confused with Quercus glaucoides, which is an evergreen oak native to Central and Southern Mexico.

Distribution map of Quercus laceyi— in Texas and Northeast Mexico.

References[edit]


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Notes

Comments

Material from Texas and northeastern Mexico, excluding the type, has been incorrectly referred to Quercus glaucoides M. Martens & Galeotti by some authors (K. C. Nixon and C. H. Muller 1992). 

 On the Edwards Plateau of Texas, Quercus laceyi occurs mostly at 350-600 m elevation; in Coahuila and Nuevo León, it occurs at 1500-2200 m. This species is sometimes associated with remnant mesic forests, which include Acer grandidentatum Nuttall, Tilia species, Quercus muhlenbergii Engelmann, and various pine and other oak species. The leaves are shallowly lobed or entire, although occasional specimens on moist sites are deeply lobed and resemble the leaves of Q . alba in outline.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Flora North America indicates that material from Texas and northeastern Mexico was incorrectly attributed to Quercus glaucoides M. Martens & Galeotti by some authors. Further, Johnston (1988) mentions Quercus laceyi is the correct name for plants listed as Quercus glaucoides in Correll and Johnston (1970). True Quercus glaucoides does not occur in Texas, or anywhere in the United States.

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